Hyaeweol Choi has relentlessly devoted her academic career to exploring the topography of modernity and gender relations in Korea under Japanese colonial rule during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, paying special attention to the roles and influences of Protestant missionaries from the United States. This book, too, probes the activities of American (female) protestant missionaries and their “women's work for women” (p. 13), as well as the activities of the Japanese colonial authorities and foreign-educated Korean women who contended, negotiated, and integrated with one another to shape modern womanhood and domesticity in early twentieth-century Korea.

A notable feature of Gender Politics at Home and Abroad, compared with Choi's previous research, is its engagement with transnational and transpacific perspectives. Broadening her attention to global Christian networks and their contributions to modern domesticity in colonial Korea and to creating Korean's future female leaders, Choi traces how foreign-educated Korean women...

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