The place of the Mongol Empire in the narrative of Chinese history has long been a focus of scholars of China's middle period. What were the short-term consequences of destruction associated with the Mongol invasion? How did the rebuilding produce long-term change in Chinese society? Wang Jinping's In the Wake of the Mongols addresses these questions through the institutions and relationships that ordered rural society in Shanxi after the 1211 Mongol invasion. She argues that a distinctive social order built around Daoist and Buddhist institutions arose in the following century, and that its afterlives continued to structure rural North Chinese society until the late Ming. This focus on rural social order enables Wang to bring history of the Mongol Empire into conversation with the historiography of local society both before and after the Yuan, which has been studied largely in southern China. She shows that a better understanding of the...

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