It is generally agreed that “without technology, pop music in the twenty-first century is unthinkable.”1 In Circuit Listening, Andrew F. Jones focuses on one crucial piece of technology from the 1960s—the transistor. Transistorized electronics provide portable and efficient devices, bringing to the world powerful computers, radios, portable tape recorders—hence, the technological development spurred by the transistor is also known as the “revolution in miniature.”2 Following various applications of the transistor, the book explains how music listening in China has been forever changed by this device.

Specific technologies provide the environment in which we engage, think, and share our experiences. As John Blacking puts it: they become a specific “mode” of music production and consumption without determining anything; they are a precondition for music making, an important element in the definition of musical sound and style, and a catalyst for musical change.3Circuit Listening provides a fresh...

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