The study of bhakti has been undergoing a resurgence lately. Extending well beyond traditional readings of poetry and hagiography, bhakti studies has become a node for cross-disciplinary research informed by timely concerns and theoretical sophistication. As it ranges across genres of historical inquiry—cultural, religious, literary, social, and intellectual—as well as the visual arts, anthropology, politics, gender, media studies, and other fields, bhakti allows for many views of South Asia, especially representations of nonelite and marginalized people who otherwise rarely appear in sources before the nineteenth century. Now central to the field is accounting for the political forces of patronage and suppression that shaped the traditions we encounter today, as well as many of our conventional categories for thinking about bhakti at all. The two books under review here demonstrate this critical, multivalent scholarship exceedingly well and push the envelope further.

Patton E. Burchett's A Genealogy of Devotion: Bhakti, Tantra...

You do not currently have access to this content.