This timely book traces how the concept of “sovereignty” has evolved in China from the Opium Wars to the present. In six chronological chapters, Maria Adele Carrai narrates the many lives of the concept: how the Chinese understood their world order before the 1830s (chapter 1); the first translations of “sovereignty” into Chinese and early attempts to apply it from the Opium War to the First Sino-Japanese War (chapter 2); its emergence as a Darwinist concept symbolizing China's survival between 1895 and 1911 (chapter 3); Republican diplomats’ judicious deployment of the concept to fight unequal treaties and establish territorial claims in non-Han areas (chapter 4); Marxist-Leninist interpretations of international law as a tool of imperialism in the first three decades of the People's Republic (chapter 5); and, finally, its most recent incarnations in the post-1990s globalized world (chapter 6). In Sovereignty in China, Carrai argues that the Chinese approached...

You do not currently have access to this content.