In Dying for Rights, the anthropologist Sandra Fahy has written a compelling and compendious book covering all the pressing issues in the field of North Korean human rights, from famine, imprisonment, and religious persecution (in “Part 1: The Crimes”) to the various ways the North Korean government deals with the worldwide accusations of its rights violations, including utilizing foreign supporters, publishing rebuttals, and mobilizing the media (in “Part II: The Denials”). In this sense, this book is even better than Fahy's fine 2015 book Marching through Suffering (also published by Columbia University Press).

Dying for Rights is also Fahy's saber, and she swings it widely against governments, institutions, and individuals who deny, disbelieve, or remain inactive in the face of mounting human rights violations by the North Korean government. “North Korea's rights abuses are the business of humanity. To think otherwise is to deem North Koreans as not part...

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