Intellectual Property Rights in China is an immensely readable book that includes real-world anecdotes of how intellectual property rights (IPR) are enforced (or not) in China, which really make the topic come alive. Zhenqing Zhang's research question is, “[W]hy do effective IPR enforcement cases occur in only some cases and not others, even though China's World Trade Organization entry in 2001 was supposed to protect all intellectual property rights?” (p. 4). To answer this question, Zhang correctly recognizes that IPR policy needs to be examined “against the greater backdrop of China's political and economic reforms.” This nuanced examination of the complex issue of IPR has roots in the field of political science, but by incorporating extensive observations about both the Chinese state and Chinese society, this book should be of obvious interest to a much wider audience.

The book begins with a useful summary of existing explanations of Chinese IPR...

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