Today the novel coronavirus, yet another pathogen that causes deadly respiratory illness, has spread globally, taking more than one thousand lives in a month. Such epidemic infections continue to threaten humankind, making research on the social, cultural, and political history of disease as relevant now as ever. American Evangelists and Tuberculosis in Modern Japan sets out to analyze government inaction in confronting the country's worst modern epidemic and the actions of foreign Protestant missionaries to address it in imperial Japan (1868–1945). A “web of moral enterprise” (p. 3) connected politicians, bureaucrats, missionaries, scientists, and physicians as they faced, and saved face in, Japan's tuberculosis crisis. Utilizing the archives of the YMCA, Salvation Army, and American Episcopal Church and the papers of missionaries and one prominent Japanese politician, Elisheva A. Perelman paints an indicting portrait of Japan's moral entrepreneurs. This story of “something that did not happen” (p. 1) describes many...

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