Qing Travelers to the Far West is an effort to comprehend the firsthand accounts and reports of the West from Qing diplomat-travelers over a period of about thirty years in the late nineteenth century. The book was written to answer an important question: how did the Chinese after the Opium Wars think of both the West and China's place in the world if “the West did not simply ‘impact’ and China did not simply ‘respond’”? (p. 230). The study suggests that rather than viewing the West through simple polarities of praise and criticism, Qing travelers created complex and multifaceted depictions of the West that responded to their different personal, political, and cultural backgrounds. Relying on the textual productions of six Qing diplomats, including poems, letters, journals, proposals, telegrams, reports, newspaper articles, and memorials to the Qing court, Jenny Huangfu Day supports her thesis through an analysis of their writings as...

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