Since the 1980s, scholars from across the disciplinary spectrum and from a variety of political vantage points have been analyzing the expanding presence of Islamic extremists in Pakistan. Particularly since the 2001 invasion and ongoing occupation of neighboring Afghanistan by the United States, the existence of violent extremists in Pakistan is a growing concern, often reduced to security issues; the strength, or lack thereof, of the Pakistani state; and attempts at identifying the culprits behind the rise of extremism, be it Pakistan's military dictator Zia ul-Haq in the late 1970s and 1980s, the Pakistan secret services (Inter-Services Intelligence), or conspiracy theories placing blame on India's intelligence agency (the Research and Analysis Wing). Rarely, however, do we get an inside perspective of the organizations, their inner workings, and the discourses they employ to legitimate their missions. Samina Yasmeen's Jihad and Dawah: Evolving Narratives of Lashkar-e-Taiba and Jamat ud Dawah provides just...

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