Global migration statistics indicate that people are on the move, crossing national borders at unprecedented rates. Ji-Yeon Jo's study of return migration, or what she calls “legacy migration” (p. 7), offers insights into a particular sub-field of migration in which members of an ethnic diaspora decide to migrate back to what is, or is imagined to be, an ancestral homeland. Rather than conceptualizing migration as unidirectional, Jo examines migration as a process that can be circular in nature and complicated by economic, political, historical, and affective factors. The focus on South Korea is timely, given the growing body of empirical work on return migration in Asia. As a country whose concepts of nationhood are closely linked to understandings of ethnicity and shared bloodlines, contemporary South Korea is currently engaged in impassioned debate over what it means to be Korean as it transitions into a multicultural society. Jo's book looks at...

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