In The Politics of Islamic Law, Iza Hussin demonstrates that the colonial encounter in British Malaya, India, and Egypt not only marginalized Islamic law but also centralized it in several significant ways. Charting a course beyond conventional approaches to law, religious doctrine, jurisprudence, and politics, Hussin produces a detailed analysis of the cultural and political complexity of the centralization of Islamic law in the colonial state. Drawing upon extensive archival research, she describes how Malay, South Asian, and Egyptian elites navigated structural and political opportunities within the colonial system. She also points out that the curtailed space of Islamic law is a realm in which local elites and other colonial subjects resist constraints even while being paradoxically hampered by the terms they contest. Indeed, Hussin makes a major contribution through the manner in which she elucidates the dynamic flux of concepts such as state, law, ethnicity, religion, and politics...

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