Of all the popular regional cinemas of India, Hindi or Bollywood film continues to dominate in India and beyond, as Samir Dayal's Dream Machine and Ajay Gehlawat's Twenty-First Century Bollywood illustrate. Since the late twentieth century, analyses of Hindi cinema have been the focus of numerous fine academic books by Madhava Prasad, Ravi Vasudevan, Vijay Mishra, Sumita Chakravarty, Jyotika Virdi, Lalitha Gopalan, and Tejaswani Ganti, among others. The majority of such works explore the world(s) of Bollywood film by examining individual films within larger thematic and theoretical contexts, including hegemonic narrativity, genre construction, gender representation, nationalism, postcolonialism, and globalization. Both books utilize this previous scholarship and extend such models of inquiry. Where the two authors primarily diverge in their analyses is found with Dayal's focus on excavating the fruitful tensions between realism and fantasy in Hindi cinema and Gehlawat's surveying of the trajectories and representations emerging in twenty-first-century Bollywood film....

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