Memory, Reconciliation, and Reunions in South Korea is a welcome addition to the fields of Korean studies and post–Cold War studies, especially in the anglophone academia, where scholarly works on separated families from the Korean War (1950–53) are scarce. Nan Kim's book investigates the Korean War's lasting impact on the intimate space of family through a contextual analysis of the war, of the June inter-Korean summit of 2000, and of the North-South separated family reunions of August 2000.

The book's introduction lays out Kim's two main theoretical frameworks to analyze and illustrate the public representation and private lives of the separated families: memory and liminality. The first section of the book, “Unsettling the Past,” examines Korea's geopolitical liminality concerning the Korean War and its aftermath. The second section, “Centering the Margin,” highlights the complex affective modes that have shaped the lives of separated families, many of whom experienced social ostracization...

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