As China's mass-internment camps for ethnic minority groups in Xinjiang gain global attention, scholars and journalists are developing an appreciation for the enormous amount of text that authorities in Xinjiang produce for local public consumption. Over the last two years, for example, Adrian Zenz has pioneered the study of public recruitment notices for security personnel and tenders for the construction of internment facilities. Other scholars, journalists, and activists have scoured the Chinese-language Internet for local officials’ own proud announcements about “educational transformation” activities and their associated internment camps, often providing the factual basis for reports on the front pages of the world's most prominent newspapers. As important as these uses of public texts have been, Frederick De Jong's new book Uyghur Texts in Context shows us that they only scratch the surface. De Jong's contribution promises to substantially widen scholars’ understanding of what public texts can tell us about life...

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