Anglophone scholarship on Korean cinema is a millennial phenomenon, beginning in the early 2000s amidst a contemporaneous boom in the South Korean film industry that followed a period of liberalization after democratic reforms in the early 1990s. Given its relatively recent establishment, most texts in the field have hewed closely to a national cinema paradigm, tracking cinema's role in the establishment of national identity in the context of postwar development and as an expression of public culture. Since the 2010s, however, newer works have complicated this straightforward national schema to examine regional exchanges and transnational forms, in response to the rise in visibility and global aspirations of other culture industries sectors—particularly those commodities that fall under the umbrella of hallyu or “the Korean wave”—and shifts in the South Korean film industry toward global markets and international co-production. Hye Seung Chung and David Scott Diffrient's Movie Migrations is an important work...

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