This book is a PhD dissertation in Sinology submitted to the Freie Universität zu Berlin in 2011. It focuses on the social and economic history of Dunhuang/Shazhou in the context of the Tibetan Empire's occupation of this Chinese city from c.787 to 848, and in relation to the Tang period that preceded it and the Guiyijun period that followed. Drawing largely on Dunhuang documents, both in Tibetan and Chinese, Taenzer primarily addresses problems relevant to the subfields of early Tibetan studies and Dunhuang studies.

The book is divided into three unequal parts. Part one (pp. 9–109) is a survey of the administrative system of the Tibetan Empire (c.605–866 CE), particularly as reflected in Dunhuang documents. Part two (pp. 110–206) focuses on demographics and population in Dunhuang and the surrounding area. Part three (pp. 207–405) concerns economy and taxation, and investigates loan, sale, and hire contracts. Part three's length is largely...

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