In a region where comparisons tend to be constrained by linguistic diversity and distinct historical legacies, the study of political science in Southeast Asia has long been defined by rich and descriptive case studies. It is difficult to pursue simultaneously in-depth and rigorously systematic comparative analysis within a region where few countries share official or nationally common languages, colonial heritages, economic development levels, and regime antecedents or outcomes. Dan Slater's Ordering Power represents an impressive venture in this regard, comparing the impact of contentious politics on elite collective action and authoritarian durability in seven Southeast Asian states. Slater's book should serve as a baseline model to which future political scientists of Southeast Asia should aspire. It is a rigorous and comparative study, in qualitative content and approach to systematic puzzle-driven inquiry, that emphasizes both the comparability of Southeast Asian states in a broader cross-regional context and the distinctive features of...

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