Michelle Bigenho's ambitious and valuable new book represents a welcome contribution on many fronts. Not only does this work introduce a little-known world of Japanese enthusiasts of Andean “folklore” music, but it also reevaluates conceptual dichotomies in popular cultural studies (e.g., appropriation versus appreciation) and postcolonial studies (e.g., domination versus resistance). Drawing on interviews with Japanese fans, and with Japanese and Bolivian performers of the music, as well as participant observation as a performing member of a traveling Andean music group, Bigenho's insightful and sensitive portrayal of a small but vibrant music scene in Japan that has garnered little scholarly attention uncovers a surprising trans-Pacific connection.

Outlining the theoretical tools employed to make sense of this connection, Bigenho proposes “intimate distance” as a key idea, defined as “the pull of desire toward difference and the contrasting distance that one still maintains while taking on the cultural trappings of an Other”...

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