The place of the group of popular religious practices known most commonly as shamanism in contemporary South Korea is one of seemingly many contradictions. While on the surface, it appears that most Koreans nowadays outwardly dismiss these practices as not significant, it is not difficult to see manifestations that would lead one to believe otherwise. Whether it is the ubiquitous advertisements on the back of bus seats for shamans who can alter one's fortune, the flashing electronic signs found throughout the country that proclaim the services of a particular shaman, or even the public staging of shamanic rites in places such as Insadong, one can easily see that the shamanic worldview is far from dormant today. Yet, it is also clear that the functions and place of shamanism have transformed over the past few decades. The dynamism and evolution of the shamanic worldview is perhaps reflective of larger Korean culture...

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