Gender and Labour in Korea and Japan provides an incisive look into the dynamics of key economic, political, and cultural transformations in contemporary Korea and Japan. Whether examining the Japanese state's imperial policies or Korea's fin-de-siècle financial crisis, the editors of this volume astutely point out that any attempt to understand Korea and Japan's long twentieth century would be remiss without accounting for the ways in which gender and sexuality have been inextricably interlinked with labor, class, nation building, and empire. Coeditors Ruth Barraclough and Elyssa Faison underscore their central point by assembling an impressive collection of historical, anthropological, and literary studies that impart breadth and depth to the gendered and sexualized dimensions of capitalism.

Heather Bowen-Struyk's chapter sets the tone of the volume by speaking directly to the book's subtitle, “sexing class.” By recognizing the similarities between the abject plight of the prostitute and the proletariat, working-class men such...

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