The nature of Muslim cultures in South Asia is so complex that at any point, it is a difficult task to capture the ever-changing dynamics of these societies. In addition to that, many aspects of these Muslim societies are totally embedded in their local cultures, particularly in their religious histories. While the discussions are still continuing about the extent and realm of this dialogue between local and universal religions, Jamal Malik in his new book, Islam in South Asia, endeavors to provide a picture of South Asian Islamic ethnoscapes in detail. This picture, however, is not limited to portraying the ground realities, but clearly reads the past and present of these communities in the new light of a plural perspective. Malik's observations in this book are guided by a vision that “plurality and pluralism actually endow Islam with dynamic power which, however, has through the centuries been taken advantage...

You do not currently have access to this content.