In Colonial Pathologies, Warwick Anderson traces the intersection of political, biomedical, military, and racial logics within an imperial order predicated on tutelage and deferral rather than segregation and exclusion. But as Anderson himself explains, this is not simply a book about the history of modern public health in the colonial Philippines or a study of U.S. imperial power and racial ideology seen through the lens of tropical medicine. Anderson's approach—like those of Paul Kramer, Vicente L. Rafael, and Michael Salman, among other historians of U.S.–Philippine relations—tracks people, discourses, and practices that were incessantly on the move, thus illuminating important developments in the metropole, as well as in the colony. In this way, Anderson's compelling dissection of “the corporeal contingencies of civic status” (p. 5) offers readers a point of entry into broader efforts to decolonize (or perhaps simply to complicate) the history of U.S.–Philippine relations, a field of scholarship...

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