Abdul Djalil Pirous (b. Meulaboh, Aceh 1932), Meditasi (Meditation), 1998, marble paste, acrylic, and gold leaf on canvas, 75 × 70 cm. Private collection at Serambi Pirous, Bandung, Indonesia. Courtesy of the artist.

Understanding regimes of medical knowledge and practice in Asia means delving into their histories to examine the political and social routes by which medical ideas, policies, and institutions were brought into being. In our opening essay, DavisakdPuaksom looks at how Pasteurian medicine entered the lives of Thai citizens and played a part in the medicalization of the Thai state between 1850 and 1950. Using a Foucauldian approach that connects medical knowledge to governmentality, Davisakd shows how Pasteurian medicine supplanted earlier pre-Pasteurian discourses, challenged traditional Thai medical practices, and captured the interest of the Siamese court. Ultimately, Pasteurian medicine became an instrument of Siamese state hegemony—the control of germs proved to be yet another means of disciplining...

You do not currently have access to this content.