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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2009) 5 (2): 83–85.
Published: 01 July 2009
...Amira Jarmakani Race and Arab Americans Before and After 9/11: From Invisible Citizens to Visible Subjects , Jamal Amaney Naber Nadine , eds. Syracuse, NY : Syracuse University Press , 2008 . Pp. xiii, 378 . ISBN 978-0-8156-3177-4 . Copyright © 2009 Association for Middle...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2010) 6 (1): 129–131.
Published: 01 March 2010
...Mastoureh Fathi Becoming Visible in Iran: Women in Contemporary Iranian Society , Honarbin-Holliday Mehri . London : Tauris Academic Studies . Pp. xii, 205 . ISBN 978-1-84511-878-5 . Copyright © 2010 Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2010...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 173–174.
Published: 01 March 2017
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2007) 3 (2): 112–115.
Published: 01 July 2007
...Mügé Galin The Book and the Roses: Sufi Women, Visibility, and Zikir in Contemporary Istanbul , Raudvere Catharina . Sweden : Bjärnums Tryckeri AB , 2002 . Pp. 248. ISBN 9186884115 . Copyright © 2007 Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2007 112  JOURNAL OF MIDDLE EAST...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2013) 9 (1): 1–29.
Published: 01 March 2013
...Faedah M. Totah The public visibility and political activity of women remain contentious social issues in the Middle East. Where women are encouraged by the state to be politically active, their ensuing visibility is perceived as threatening to the local male-dominated social order, which in turn...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2016) 12 (2): 181–202.
Published: 01 July 2016
... on different ends of both the social and the Islamist-secularist axes highlight the similarities and differences of intimate concerns and encounters. Urban beauty salons are where publicly debated ideals of femininity and sexuality are visibly manufactured, and those involved have to negotiate new...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2011) 7 (2): 27–55.
Published: 01 July 2011
... contexts of a growing Muslim German public sphere, Muslim German cultural production, and the public sphere at large. Kandemir’s transformation unfolds in Germany in the middle of an often young and visible larger movement of Muslim piety. Her narrative and experience transcend her individual life and...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2012) 8 (3): 113–137.
Published: 01 November 2012
... sexuality that influence subjectivity via their online visibility. Mathew Gagné is a Ph.D. student in Anthropology at the University of Toronto. He has an academic and professional background in sociology, Middle East Studies, diaspora and transnationalism studies, and program and policy evaluation...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2013) 9 (3): 28–53.
Published: 01 November 2013
... visibility of female militancy in labor protests. As a result of these transformations, women’s roles in labor protests have become part of the process of men reclaiming their masculinity, which has been humiliated by wage erosion, the transformation of labor relations, and the coercive nature of...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2014) 10 (3): 62–86.
Published: 01 November 2014
... our discipline more visible in different institutions and organizations, including MESA as well as your committed work with the Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies. In addition, we deeply appreciate your mentoring of students and junior faculty. As was communicated by one of your students, you are...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2007) 3 (1): 6–34.
Published: 01 March 2007
...Lilia Labidi This paper analyzes how the discourse of the independent Tunisian feminist movement of the 1980s brought new visibility and appreciation to the early feminists of the 1930s, 40s, and 50s, and how it revived tensions that had arisen during the earlier period. The paper also examines how...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2008) 4 (3): 89–118.
Published: 01 November 2008
... accompanied by the virtual unveiling of women bloggers in cyberspace. Through their personal narration, women bloggers transgress several sociocultural boundaries. The strategy of women in both spaces is the same: to become more visible, to speak out, and to create a new identity closer to their “inner self...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2010) 6 (3): 91–117.
Published: 01 November 2010
...Carla Jones The recent and highly visible rise of Islamic consumer culture in contemporary urban Indonesia is a source of both pleasure and anxiety for many Indonesians, figuring in debates about the appeal of a new piety there in the past decade. At the center of these debates is the image of the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2015) 11 (2): 258–259.
Published: 01 July 2015
... exhibiting false consciousness. I find that the howzevi women were both facilitated and limited by self-imposed practices, such as exercising caution about their social visibility outside the home or showing deference toward their husbands and fathers. Because their experiences with the “rule of men” were...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2017) 13 (2): 219–221.
Published: 01 July 2017
..., Ural and Beşpınar find that professional, middle-class gay men have the capacity to establish more autonomous spaces and thereby are more able to sustain a double life in which they can, at least in some places, live a visible gay identity and lifestyle. Ural and Beşpınar’s study thus demonstrates how...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2013) 9 (1): 110–125.
Published: 01 March 2013
... – 2). Some members of the association also worked in the domestic sectors making invisible money, but the women who got involved with the microcredit project were now making visible money. Viviana Zelizer (1989) believes that money is a socio-cultural con- cept influenced by variables like...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 141–142.
Published: 01 March 2017
... reference the ongoing duality of life and war without precluding hope. In a fictionalized battlefield, I show a couple in a series of everyday activities: eating breakfast, watching television, and celebrating their wedding. Though they do not visibly express emotion, the man and woman embody the power of...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2008) 4 (2): 100–103.
Published: 01 July 2008
... everyday, non-confrontational (and therefore less visible), yet highly constructive linkages between the Turkish state and Islamic actors. She argues that such alternative channels surfaced during the state’s growing tolerance of Islam in the 1980s, and that the intent of “non-defi ant Islamic...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2010) 6 (1): 131–134.
Published: 01 March 2010
... BOOK REVIEWS  131 2009 presidential elections. Although Becoming Visible in Iran can be counted as a landmark in Iranian women’s narratives, it could have usefully included more on the issue of social class, which it addresses briefl y in the fi ft h text but leaves unproblematized. Th...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2019) 15 (1): 125–134.
Published: 01 March 2019
... campaign addresses these issues in two ways: first, by battling gendered politics at mosques that often leaves women with subsidiary roles and curtails their mobility and visibility; second, by reenvisioning the mosque as a more familial and participatory space for socialization, reminiscent of the role it...