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village

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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2009) 5 (1): 108–111.
Published: 01 March 2009
...Roberta Micallef We Have No Microbes Here: Healing Practices in a Turkish Black Sea Village , Önder Sylvia Wing . Durham, NC : Carolina Academic Press , 2007 . Pp. xxv, 304 . ISBN 978-0-89089-573-3 . Copyright © 2009 Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2009 108...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2012) 8 (2): 26–50.
Published: 01 July 2012
... France with non-governmental organization workers and village girls, it demonstrates how humanitarian work is rendered meaningful by specific actors, its effects coexisting alongside, rather than supplanting, other forms of sociality. In tracing the ways in which a youth habitus based on rights is “made...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2005) 1 (2): 150–153.
Published: 01 July 2005
...Arbella Bet-Shlimon The Object of Memory: Arab and Jew Narrate the Palestinian Village , Slyomovics Susan . Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press , 1998 . xxv + 294 pp. including appendices, notes, bibliography and index. $19.95 paperback. Copyright © 2005 Association...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2017) 13 (3): 376–394.
Published: 01 November 2017
... isolated act motivated by urban conditions of poverty, but many women became skilled repeat offenders who worked individually or in teams, taking advantage of the growing transportation networks that linked villages, towns, and cities. The theft examined includes shoplifting, pickpocketing, burglary...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2010) 6 (1): 1–45.
Published: 01 March 2010
... examine just a few of the many sites where “Muslim women’s rights” are differentially in play: in Egyptian and Palestinian women’s NGOs as well as in rural villages where ordinary women and girls live their lives at the intersection of national media and local institutions. Lila Abu-Lughod is Joseph...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2009) 5 (3): 74–101.
Published: 01 November 2009
...Ray Jureidini From a series of interviews with Lebanese middle- and upper-class women in their latter years, the paper traces an oral history of domestic service in Lebanon over the past century. The interviews reveal various periods when women and girls were recruited from the local village poor...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2009) 5 (3): 120–144.
Published: 01 November 2009
... nationalism, bilocality and bifocality, and nuclearity. Presenting the case of five closely related and connected families from the same Christian village in the Metn region of Lebanon, the paper argues that their experiences offer new insights into the relationship between nation and family, and nation and...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2005) 1 (2): 163–164.
Published: 01 July 2005
...) 2003, 56 minutes Reviewed by Rhoda Kanaaneh, Department of Anthropology, American University Ebtisam Maar’ana’s first feature film is a meditation on political and sexual silencing and a powerful statement of her refusal to be silenced. Mara’ana’s questions to the people in her village of...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2008) 4 (1): 138–141.
Published: 01 March 2008
... journalist, decides to return to his native village because city life has become too expensive and fraught with racial tension. Signs like “Arabs out = Peace + Security” have proliferated over the landscape. Moreover, the narrator’s position at a Jewish newspa- per has changed. His reports from the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2006) 2 (1): 129–133.
Published: 01 March 2006
... minimalism, evocation and allusion. Set mostly in perplexed, transformation-torn Arabian cities and villages, The Tree presents an explicit divergence where modernity and history meet resistance and ambivalence. Reflecting on the past reaffirms its richness, inscribing long-lasting traces...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2015) 11 (3): 325–330.
Published: 01 November 2015
... mobilization and women’s labor in Istanbul. She talks with villagers and barbers, feminists and politicians, minorities and businesspeople—sometimes people who are all of these at once—and observes how seemingly Islamic themes relate to nationalism. She also observes that women and minorities are more likely...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2007) 3 (2): 115–117.
Published: 01 July 2007
... occurred twenty to forty years ago, but most are clustered in the recent present, from the 1990s until now. Two of the more distant in time involve villages and villagers; neverthe- less, the emphasis is on the elite, upper- and middle-class, Westernized families whose members are likely...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2005) 1 (2): 148–150.
Published: 01 July 2005
... changes and improvements that took place until 2002 is not a small accomplishment for a small book. The Object of Memory: Arab and Jew Narrate the Palestinian Village Susan Slyomovics. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1998. xxv...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2009) 5 (3): 190–192.
Published: 01 November 2009
... narratives of Palestinian women in the West Bank village of Musharafah, Nefi ssa Naguib’s ethnography, Women, Water and Memory, brings to life the complex social relationships articulated by their diverse biographies. She highlights practices of the mundane in the village to illuminate...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2015) 11 (2): 256–257.
Published: 01 July 2015
... represented as part of Palestinian dispossession, my ethnographic findings indicate that tasting, eating, and cooking animate alternative ways of narrating history and reanchoring Palestinians to their land. In particular, I show how Palestinian women use food to connect back to villages depopulated during...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2015) 11 (1): 114–116.
Published: 01 March 2015
... Life in Contemporary Turkey: Migration, Gender, and Ethnic Identity is a meticulous ethnography on the profound transformation of Kurdish society and its patriarchal culture with migration within Turkey. Based on twelve years of research, the book follows a group of villagers in the eastern city of...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2016) 12 (3): 422–424.
Published: 01 November 2016
... male characters of the novels experience the city. For example, in Aghacy’s reading of Balqis Al-Humani’s Hayy al-Lija (1969), she shows how the rural values that villagers from the south brought with them produce gendered spaces that remain even when these villagers move to an urban setting...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2009) 5 (3): 193–197.
Published: 01 November 2009
... Iman Humaydan Younes. Northampton, MA: Interlink, 2008. Pp. 228. ISBN 978-1-56656-706-1. Reviewed by Maya Mikdashi, Columbia University In Wild Mulberries and B as in Beirut, Iman Humaydan Younes narrates the dialectic between Lebanon’s capital city and its villages...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2018) 14 (3): 379–383.
Published: 01 November 2018
... local professionals. I worked with Palestinian midwives to design a midwife-led continuity model that connected city hospitals to their satellite villages, combining my experiences in Norway with Palestinian midwives’ wishes to strengthen and better use their knowledge. We wrote a concept note...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2016) 12 (1): 126–138.
Published: 01 March 2016
.... Urban women like the informants cited above found themselves at the center of changes due to the protests and implementation of “Islamic” social codes in cities. Some volunteered to work in villages where these events had not been so directly experienced. During the cultural revolution that followed the...