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unveil

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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2016) 12 (3): 306–322.
Published: 01 November 2016
...Edith Szanto Abstract During the onslaught of the Islamic caliphate on Kobanî, Syria, media outlets across the globe broadcast pictures of brave and often unveiled Kurdish women fighting the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIS), a quintessentially male force of destruction. The images of...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2016) 12 (2): 203–224.
Published: 01 July 2016
... surrogates. They felt the need to meet them, even if only once, to bring the relationship to a good end. Their balancing act unveils the asymmetries that structure transnational surrogacy. Gay men rely on distance and proximity to create consistent stories of origin for their children. They do so, however...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2007) 3 (3): 75–98.
Published: 01 November 2007
... political regimes have assigned to the veil meanings corresponding to their own ideologies. Through imposed unveiling and re-veiling, these regimes have constructed an ideal image of Iranian women and in turn of Iran as a modern or an Islamic country. This essentialized singular image has led to the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2008) 4 (3): 89–118.
Published: 01 November 2008
... accompanied by the virtual unveiling of women bloggers in cyberspace. Through their personal narration, women bloggers transgress several sociocultural boundaries. The strategy of women in both spaces is the same: to become more visible, to speak out, and to create a new identity closer to their “inner self...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2007) 3 (3): 126–129.
Published: 01 November 2007
..., coupled with the Soviets’ general encouragement of national cultural identification, set the stage for po- litical ferment. In fact, unveiling campaigns in Uzbekistan were widely unsuccessful. More women permanently unveiled in places where such campaigns had not occurred than in places...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2012) 8 (2): 116–119.
Published: 01 July 2012
... share her background and politics. She insists first on the complex history of veiling and unveiling in Egypt over the course of the twentieth century. This history is situated not only within Egyptian domestic politics, but in a larger context of Western influence, colonialism, and Arab...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 181–185.
Published: 01 March 2017
... shocking tweet read, “Wives of the military coup soldiers are our war-trophy.” With progovernment protestors filling the public during the night, not only did (unveiled) women express fear and experiences of street harassment and strategize their mobility and clothing to self-protect, but also protestor...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2017) 13 (3): 458–460.
Published: 01 November 2017
... who has found embodied activism in academe. To work from within and without the body is to find alternative ways of navigation. To consider the shamed body is to unveil the social constructions of ableism. Writing and teaching, then, become tools of activism, and it is a slow and painful rebirth to...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2008) 4 (2): 106–108.
Published: 01 July 2008
... represent the nation. Th us, for example, Mahmud Mukhtar’s sculpture Nahdat Misr (unveiled(unveiled inin 1928)1928) iconizediconized thethe fi guregure ofof thethe EgyptianEgyptian femalefemale peas-peas- ant or fallaha. Baron focuses on the rise of an illustrated press and the visual documentation...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2009) 5 (1): 1–23.
Published: 01 March 2009
... leading up to 9/11 and in its immediate aftermath, Amer- Iican and British media demonized the burqa as “Afghanistan’s veil of terror,” a tool of extremists and the epitome of political and sexual repres- sion (Shah 2001). But after the Taliban’s fall, when women failed to unveil...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2011) 7 (1): 70–89.
Published: 01 March 2011
..., she dismissed the idea that Egyptian women should unveil simply to be more like their European counterparts. She warns: “If we follow every- thing Western we will be destroying our own civilization, and a people without a civilization is weakened and will undoubtedly vanish…” (Nasif 1998, 144...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2009) 5 (1): 94–97.
Published: 01 March 2009
... equates the unveiled body with female emancipation. A certain distaste for the veil is also apparent in Fanon, whose work has oft en been naively subsumed under the category of simply portray- ing the perspective of “the oppressed.” Zayzafoon shows how, for Fanon, the veiled woman...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2009) 5 (1): 113–116.
Published: 01 March 2009
... chapter 2 is refreshing as it rightly focuses attention on embodied subjects as citizens of nation- states. Th rough a self-refl exive lens, Moallem traces the history of forced unveiling during the reign of Reza Shah (1926–41). She argues that the authoritarian state imposed coercive...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2005) 1 (2): 1–24.
Published: 01 July 2005
..., and geography in Iranian nationalism. She is currently completing two academic projects. The first, “Unveiling Women’s Lives: Science, Sexuality, and Religion in Modern,” documents the social and cultural history of Iranian women from the late nineteenth century until the establishment of the Islamic...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2017) 13 (3): 476–478.
Published: 01 November 2017
..., for example, that conflate liberation with rape, resulting in sexual terrorism. The epistemic violence behind the drive to know and unveil the Muslim woman structures the dominant frameworks in which Muslim women are expected to tell their stories. It claims to shape how we understand the contours...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2008) 4 (1): 53–82.
Published: 01 March 2008
... journal al-Mu’ayyad, arguing in favor of unveiling and JOURNAL OF MIDDLE EAST WOMEN’S STUDIES Vol. 4, No. 1 (Winter 2008) © 2008 54  JOURNAL OF MIDDLE EAST WOMEN’S STUDIES ending the seclusion of women. A scandal broke out in Iraq, followed by...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2005) 1 (2): 157–162.
Published: 01 July 2005
... journalist friend of the director, Soudabeh. Unveiled at home, Soudabeh wears a white scarf and long overcoat (Islamic hijāb,. required of all women nine years and above when appearing in public) as she gets into her car to attend a meeting. Soudabeh and her husband have a friendly and...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2017) 13 (2): 321–323.
Published: 01 July 2017
... interaction within and outside their families, in a social context that emphasizes values associated with Muslim faith. The “coming out” as a veiled subject is mirrored by the story of unveiling of a famous American Egyptian fashion and lifestyle blogger, Winnie Detwa, in chapter 7. For Detwa, giving up the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2009) 5 (2): 106–109.
Published: 01 July 2009
... required the unveil- ing of modern Iranian women, but no less importantly the veiling of male homoeroticism. Najmabadi’s scholarship uses the gaze of audiences past and present as an analytical category, but her explanation does not limit this gaze to an easy colonial fi xation with the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2018) 14 (1): 83–85.
Published: 01 March 2018
... 1930s in response to an increasingly heterosocial public sphere and women’s unveiling. While prerevolutionary Islamic discourse shared some similarities with leftist and nationalist art discourses, the Islamic press considered the woman’s dancing body to be “evil inciting.” The cabaret dancer occupied a...