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tunisian

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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2007) 3 (1): 6–34.
Published: 01 March 2007
...Lilia Labidi This paper analyzes how the discourse of the independent Tunisian feminist movement of the 1980s brought new visibility and appreciation to the early feminists of the 1930s, 40s, and 50s, and how it revived tensions that had arisen during the earlier period. The paper also examines how...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2011) 7 (1): 1–38.
Published: 01 March 2011
...Hagar Salamon; Esther Juhasz In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the Tunisian Jewish female body was subjected to a dramatic fattening process in preparation for marriage. Immediately following the girl’s engagement, her body became the focus of an intense transformative regimen aimed...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2012) 8 (3): 89–112.
Published: 01 November 2012
... that same-sex intimacies have not been a salient political concern for the Tunisian state, although recent events suggest a pronouncedly different future. Dr. Rodney W. Collins is a socio-cultural anthropologist with nearly fifteen years of experience conducting qualitative research in the Middle...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2015) 11 (3): 354–358.
Published: 01 November 2015
... complementarity rather than equality between the sexes was proposed for the new constitution, mobilizing women, civil society, opposition parties, and the labor union movement al-Ittihad al-Amm al-Tunisi lil-Shughl (General Union of Tunisian Workers) to protest. Violence against women appeared to be increasing...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2015) 11 (3): 365–367.
Published: 01 November 2015
... in public life, including associations, government, and public- or private-sector decision-making positions. Tounissiet is an apolitical organization that aims to promote the roles of Tunisian women without distinction among them. Our slogan is “Tounissiet pour les Tounissiets” (Tounissiet for all...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2007) 3 (1): 4–5.
Published: 01 March 2007
... dominant post-colonial Tunisian women’s organizations, Lilia Labidi explicates the trajectories whereby feminist politics have become part of the Tunisian statist project. Her paper goes on to suggest ways in which new languages, strategies, and subjects need to be articu- lated for a...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2007) 3 (1): 133–137.
Published: 01 March 2007
..., the oral history of early Tunisian feminists, the development of women’s rights in the Arab world, violence against women, and the construction of values and morality in the public sphere. She has organized several national and international conferences on medical practice and...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2016) 12 (1): 88–92.
Published: 01 March 2016
... weakened the Ottoman Empire, including the Tunisian province. Financial difficulties paved the way for reforms, for example, the 1861 constitution, which gave more power to the state. Patronage of education and religious endowments, formerly the responsibility of elite women, became state-provided services...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2005) 1 (2): 140–143.
Published: 01 July 2005
... tribal solidarities. They 142  JOURNAL OF MIDDLE EAST WOMEN’S STUDIES turned to family law as a means by which this could be accomplished. That is, by which a new vision of family, community, and society could take hold. The Tunisian Code of Personal Status (CPS) adopted in...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2018) 14 (3): 343–347.
Published: 01 November 2018
... (161). The Tunisian government, in contrast, avoided controversy over EC in 2002 by recognizing that Tunisian women could not exercise political, economic, and educational rights without having reproductive control and autonomy. In his chapter Faysal El-Kak explains that Lebanon introduced EC “quietly...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2015) 11 (2): 227–229.
Published: 01 July 2015
... the chapter on Libya merit a focus on women when women played a greater role in the Tunisian revolution and afterward? When Khalil writes that the Libyan case disproves “the notion that a patriarchal society translates into the absence of women from situations of war, revolution, or even the public...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 135–137.
Published: 01 March 2017
... education and sexual counseling. The most impressive for me was reading about Tunisian women who teach fellow male university students how to use condoms and those who provide assistance for street prostitutes and free HIV testing and prophylactics. Her reading of historical research could be more...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2013) 9 (3): 148–150.
Published: 01 November 2013
..., acting as guardian slaves, and participating in courtly politics. An interesting twist to the idea of the harem comes from Julia Clancy-Smith, who discusses how European and Tunisian elite families shared intimate spaces and socialized with each other, not in the domes- tic sphere, but in sea...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2018) 14 (3): 348–350.
Published: 01 November 2018
... literally in need of archives,” declares Hela Ammar, a Tunisian visual artist and “self-described militant feminist.” Ammar’s statement, published in March 2014 on the multilingual research forum Ibraaz, is one among many declarations about archive formation after the Arab Spring (Gabsi 2014 ). Underlying...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2017) 13 (3): 438–441.
Published: 01 November 2017
... Structure of Tunisian Ethnic Groups Revealed by Paternal Lineages .” American Journal of Physical Anthropology 146 , no. 2 : 271 – 81 . Fanon Frantz . 2004 (1959). A Dying Colonialism . New York : Grove . Fellag Nora . 2014 . “ The Muslim Label: How French North Africans Have...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2005) 1 (1): 110–146.
Published: 01 March 2005
... independence and under the leadership of President Bourguiba, Tunisian women held rights that were far in advance of other MENA countries. By the mid-1970s, Tuni- sia reported a 12% female share of the labor force. Meanwhile, in oil-rich Iran, the female labor force measured 12–14% (depending on the source...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2012) 8 (2): 113–116.
Published: 01 July 2012
... La Vie Simple (The Simple Life) by Tunisian Souad Guellouz. The task of bringing in conversation key texts from the Arabophone and Franco- phone traditions of the three Maghribi countries is commendable and, unfortunately, rarely undertaken in the field of Maghribi literature. In...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2006) 2 (2): 143–146.
Published: 01 July 2006
... the liberation pe- riod to advance their agenda. Chapter seven offers a historical account of the Tunisian state officials’ efforts to advance women’s rights. Despite the state’s significant success, it has alienated women from their own struggle and failed in eliminating gender discrimination...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2018) 14 (3): 292–313.
Published: 01 November 2018
... mothers as illustrated by writings produced by nongovernmental organizations like the Moroccan Insaf and the Tunisian Amal associations; the Tunisian Association for Democratic Women; the Nada and Wassila networks for the protection of children’s and women’s rights, respectively, in Algeria; and the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2018) 14 (2): 143–151.
Published: 01 July 2018
... coincided with the arrival on the literary scene of Francophone Maghribi writers who openly proclaimed their same-sex desires and sexual histories, beginning with the Moroccan Rachid O. ( 1995 ) and the Franco-Tunisian Eyet-Chékib Djaziri ( 1997 ). 2 Like writers who would follow them, these novelists...