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syrian

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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2015) 11 (2): 224–226.
Published: 01 July 2015
...Shayna M. Silverstein The Politics of Love: Sexuality, Gender, and Marriage in Syrian Television Drama Joubin Rebecca Lanham, MD : Lexington , 2013 486 pages. isbn 978-0-7391-8429-5 Copyright © 2015 by the Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2015 In this compendium...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2015) 11 (2): 244–245.
Published: 01 July 2015
... Copyright © 2015 by the Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2015 The Syrian Women’s Forum for Peace is a civilian organization that aims to empower women in peacemaking and to influence global and Syrian public opinions to pressure decision makers to work for peace. The Syrian...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2016) 12 (3): 306–322.
Published: 01 November 2016
... women fighting Islamist male aggressors aroused outrage, admiration, and pity among observers. But had all Kurdish fighters been male or had women fought for ISIS, viewers might have reacted differently. To examine some of the most widely disseminated gendered pictures and videos of the Syrian uprising...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2016) 12 (1): 50–67.
Published: 01 March 2016
...Rebecca Joubin Abstract Syrian miniseries engage in multifaceted discourses of fatherhood inherently linked with the rise and fall of the qabaday (tough man). Before the uprising, while the avowed focus was on gender constructions, in truth, politics lay at the heart of the messages. With the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2019) 15 (1): 48–74.
Published: 01 March 2019
...Rahaf Aldoughli Abstract This is a revisionist study of Syrian Baʾathism. At its heart is an examination of ingrained masculinist bias. This article argues that there is a reciprocal relationship between militarism and masculinity, achieved through gratifying protection for both the nation and...
Image
Published: 01 November 2018
Figure 11. An ordinary domestic scene with our Syrian grandmother, Muzayyan Kotob, sewing in the foreground in their Aramco home and our uncle Ghassan in the background at the open American-style table set for a meal (early 1960s). Photograph by Fahmi Basrawi. Figure 11. An ordinary domestic More
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2010) 6 (2): 86–114.
Published: 01 July 2010
...John Tofik Karam This article asks how Syrian-Lebanese men and non-Middle Eastern Brazilian women have enacted their relationship to belly dancingin São Paulo. While men and women of Arab origins have usually framed the dance as an essential link to their ethnic heritage, non-Arab female...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2013) 9 (2): 80–107.
Published: 01 July 2013
... use gendered, maternal imagery to produce a liberal stance on terrorism that combines sympathetic comprehension of the forces that foster violence with condemnation of the violence itself. The article uses Syrian novelist Khaled Khalifa’s Madih al-Karahiya (In Praise of Hatred , 2006) as an...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2009) 5 (3): 74–101.
Published: 01 November 2009
... as well from among Syrians, Palestinians, Kurds, Egyptians, and others in accordance with convenience and regional political circumstances. The long-term employment of Arab women in domestic service, with a primary focus on “live-in” maids, may be characterized as carrying a “burden” of obligation...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2016) 12 (3): 303–305.
Published: 01 November 2016
... track of the barely viable Syrian peace talks going on (or, more often, fizzling) in Geneva in February 2016. Practicing this double vision has made me appreciate these articles individually. But the effort also has made me even more aware of how important it is for us all to read these articles...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2009) 5 (1): 111–113.
Published: 01 March 2009
.... viii, 196. ISBN 978-0-8223-4035-5. Reviewed by Christa Salamandra, Lehman College, City University of New York In Dissident Syria, scholar of contemporary Arabic literature miriam cooke sheds light on the heretofore neglected world of Syrian opposi- tional culture. Expanding beyond her usual...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2018) 14 (2): 235.
Published: 01 July 2018
... the needle of hope. They have laid bare man’s truest follies, his deepest lies, and his most terrible terrors. With this in mind, I see the female form, her hidden world, her inner rose in bloom. In my painting Flowers , conceived as a commentary on the women of my Syrian homeland and their...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2016) 12 (3): 301–302.
Published: 01 November 2016
... revolutions. Analyzing the coverage of Arab and Kurdish women’s participation in the Syrian turmoil, Szanto questions the stakes of Anglophone media in representing women as victims, heroines, or pawns, arguing that this typology masks as much as it reveals. Tadros turns our attention away from Egyptian women...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2018) 14 (1): 89–91.
Published: 01 March 2018
...Emily Drumsta Le corps dans le roman des écrivaines syriennes contemporaines: Dire, écrire, inscrire la différence ( The Body in Contemporary Syrian Women’s Novels: Speaking, Writing, Inscribing Difference ) . Censi Martina . Leiden : Brill 2016 . 196 pages. ISBN 9004311319...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2018) 14 (2): 242–245.
Published: 01 July 2018
...Ayşe Toprak Copyright © 2018 by the Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2018 I believe in the power of documentaries to engage hearts and minds beyond the screen and to challenge public attitudes. When the war in Syria started in 2011, I kept seeing Syrian refugees sleeping on the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2005) 1 (3): 147–151.
Published: 01 November 2005
... Ba’ath regime came to power in 1963, the leaders initiated a campaign to violently contain Kurdish minorities in the northern Syrian Jazira region, issuing the slogan “Save the Jazira from becoming a second Israel.”1 Kurds were deported to Turkey, dis- placed from fertile land...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2008) 4 (1): 107–124.
Published: 01 March 2008
... with whom she shared an interest in the promotion of Arabic language and literature. Little is known of her marriage, which was childless and seems to have been brief. Said Bey al-Naaman Hamada was a kinsman and a Syrian-French military offi cer. One document indicates that he encour- aged...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2005) 1 (3): 125–127.
Published: 01 November 2005
... “Th e Rediscovery of Shirin.” Early in the first chapter, Baum makes the important observa- tion that “the West views the Orient principally through the lens of Greek-speaking Byzantine culture” (12), with the result that little is known about the West Syrian Church and still less...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2005) 1 (2): 25–54.
Published: 01 July 2005
... about the cultural scene inside Hafiz Asad’s Syria of the 1990s. Many assumed that such a regime is so repressive that writers of conscience are either in jail, like Nizar Nayyuf, or in exile, like Zakaria Tamer. In 1992, the critic Jean Fon- taine reduced the whole of Syrian literature to...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2013) 9 (1): 137–139.
Published: 01 March 2013
... that focuses on Syrian preacher Houda al-Habash, the founder of one of the first schools for girls to study Qur’an in Damascus, Syria. The film, which targets Western audi- ences, provides a rare close-up view of how women are engaging with the tradition of Qur’anic memorization and recitation...