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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2008) 4 (2): 60–80.
Published: 01 July 2008
...Sarah A. Kaiksow This paper explores imperial masculinity from the perspective of a British soldier who fought against the Dhofar revolution from 1968 to 1970 while serving in the British-led Army of the Sultan of Oman. Previous writings on masculinity in the context of empire have largely focused...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2009) 5 (2): 53–82.
Published: 01 July 2009
... Hatun (the wife and Amother of two of the most powerful sultans in Ottoman history),1 which appeared in the Turkish historical journal Tarih Dünyası (The world of history) in 1950, was introduced by the journal’s editor as [O]ne of our young and valuable historians, whose...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2009) 5 (3): 36–53.
Published: 01 November 2009
... work in the orphanage, the staff at Falah were in close contact with the mothers of orphans (a fatherless child is defi ned as an orphan), and decided to address their problems. According to ‘Amer Sultan (2007), fi nancial director of the Falah Society, “We felt that young widows...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2014) 10 (3): 8–39.
Published: 01 November 2014
... stalwart in the face of pirate violence. She then continued to behave with courage and cunning as an eventual captive of the Moroccan sultan. She nursed her ailing husband until he died, fended off enormous pressure from the ladies of the sul- tan’s court to convert to Islam, eluded the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2014) 10 (2): 135–151.
Published: 01 July 2014
... them deal with cultural and religious taboos that may hinder their success. A wider study involving the rest of the governorates in Sultanate of Oman is recommended to encourage a comprehensive nationwide strategy or policy promoting female entre- preneurs in the Sultanate...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 135–137.
Published: 01 March 2017
... Najmabadi (though oversimplifying their argument for a nonacademic audience), and I would have liked her to ask more questions about the lives of nonelites, from the boys adored in the sultan’s court to the girls who did not bleed on their wedding night. Historians, of course, have limited access to the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2007) 3 (2): 112–115.
Published: 01 July 2007
... sultanate and the end of the caliphate in 1923–24 came a shift in legisla- tive power from religious institutions to representative parliamentarian- JOURNAL OF MIDDLE EAST WOMEN’S STUDIES Vol. 3, No. 2 (Spring 2007). © 2007...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2011) 7 (2): 109–111.
Published: 01 July 2011
... archive of stories, poems, and—taking off in the postcolonial period— novels, testifies to a long tradition of feminine literary production that is often linked to a subversion of patriarchal power. Diaconoff claims that a period of political liberalization under the rule of Sultan Mohammed VI...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2011) 7 (3): 116–118.
Published: 01 November 2011
... the sultan’s harem. Shadow theater welcomed heteroeroticism, depicting both men and women as sexually libidinous and promiscuous. This representation contrasted with the medieval Sufi literature, which lauded homosociality through its representations of promiscuous women and moral men. Hence...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2011) 7 (3): 119–121.
Published: 01 November 2011
... the Qur’an, Hadith, and some Hanafi texts. Chapter 2 skips through to the early Ottoman period and looks at imperial views of zina as expressed in the kanunnames (law codes) of Sultan Selim I and Suleiman, as well as the fatwas of Ebu Su‘ud. Semerd- jian argues that the early Ottoman state...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2011) 7 (2): 106–109.
Published: 01 July 2011
... political liberalization under the rule of Sultan Mohammed VI nurtured women’s entry into key sectors of the public sphere, includ- ing, most significantly here, the increased production of literary texts. By focusing exclusively on the Moroccan national context, Diaconoff’s analysis highlights the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2012) 8 (2): 113–116.
Published: 01 July 2012
... disciplinary boundaries, the book offers a reading of three major novels from the postcolonial Maghrib with no restriction of geographic origin or lan- guage: ‘Am al-Fayl (Year of the Elephant) by Moroccan Leila Abouzeid, Ombre Sultane (A Sister to Scheherazade) by Algerian Assia Djebar, and...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2016) 12 (3): 455–459.
Published: 01 November 2016
... . Mernissi Fatima . 1993 (1990). The Forgotten Queens of Islam (Sultanes oubliées), translated by Lakeland Mary Jo . Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press . Mernissi Fatima . 1994 . Dreams of Trespass: Tales of a Harem Girlhood . Cambridge, MA : Perseus . Mernissi...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2013) 9 (2): 32–57.
Published: 01 July 2013
... Kemal 1989).3 When her bust was erected in Sultan Ahmet Square in 1973, to commemorate the famous speech she had made there in protest of the Greek invasion of Izmir, it was blown up three days later never to be replaced (Sönmez 1973). At times, Halide Edib has been maligned as a dönme, or...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2005) 1 (3): 116–122.
Published: 01 November 2005
... (Ataturk) by the sultan-caliph’s government during the allied occupation of Istanbul. While she wrote most of her works in Turkish, Halide Edib authored two additional nonfi ction publications in English, Turkey Faces West (19301930), bbasedased oonn llecturesectures sshehe ggaveave iinn...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2005) 1 (3): 1–19.
Published: 01 November 2005
... to which only the sultan had access. 4  JOURNAL OF MIDDLE EAST WOMEN’S STUDIES Indeed, “the power of the harem image lay in the notion of a forbidden world of women, of sexuality caged and inaccessible” (Graham-Brown 1988:70). Western women had the possibility of rendering...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2018) 14 (1): 25–44.
Published: 01 March 2018
... ( al-shudhudh al-jinsi ), a term used by the American-educated Iraqi sociologist ʿAli al-Wardi, became an important topic in the 1950s Iraqi public sphere. Al-Wardi’s Wuʿaz al-Salatin ( The Sultans’ Preachers , 1954 ) was a rare and unique intervention on homosexuality in Iraq; Massad ( 2007 , 141...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2012) 8 (2): 51–77.
Published: 01 July 2012
... to wasted lives and obstructing sexual het- eronormativity. In 1954, Iraqi sociologist ‘Ali al-Wardi launched a wide- ranging debate with his book Wu‘az al-Salatin (The Sultans’ Preachers), which argued that the prevalence of both male and female homosexual- ity in the Arab world was...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2005) 1 (2): 25–54.
Published: 01 July 2005
... is not worth studying. It may have been her awareness of cultural isolation that led Nadia to broaden her scope. In 1993, she published Sirwal Barhum (Barhum’s Baggy Pants) about the Safarbarlik, or forced mobilization of Syrian men to fight on behalf of the Ottoman Sultanate during World...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2016) 12 (3): 382–410.
Published: 01 November 2016
... their memories. Although they know well that their children were killed and will never return, they keep sharing these memories in public mourning to ensure that their children will not be forgotten and new disappearances will not take place. A Peace Mothers member, Sultan Bozkurt, explains how she...