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sufi

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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2005) 1 (3): 133–138.
Published: 01 November 2005
...Karen G. Ruffle BOOK REVIEWS  133 Th e Female Voice in Sufi Ritual: Devotional Practices of Pakistan and India Shemeem Burney Abbas. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2002. Pp. xxx + 209...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2007) 3 (2): 112–115.
Published: 01 July 2007
...Mügé Galin The Book and the Roses: Sufi Women, Visibility, and Zikir in Contemporary Istanbul , Raudvere Catharina . Sweden : Bjärnums Tryckeri AB , 2002 . Pp. 248. ISBN 9186884115 . 112  JOURNAL OF MIDDLE EAST WOMEN’S STUDIES BOOK REVIEWS...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2016) 12 (1): 68–87.
Published: 01 March 2016
...J. Andrew Bush Abstract Based on ethnographic fieldwork in the Kurdistan region of Iraq, this article tracks the imbrication of ordinary and mystical desire in the life of a Muslim man who disavows pietistic forms of ethical striving. It examines the way tropes of desire from Sufi poetry affect...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2011) 7 (3): 116–118.
Published: 01 November 2011
... interesting readings of the book comes through the comparative analysis of Sufism and the Ottoman shadow theater. Chapter 3 examines the orthodox and Sufi conceptions of sexuality. A central theme of dispute between Sufis and orthodoxy was the contemplation of the beauty of beardless boys...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2016) 12 (1): 1.
Published: 01 March 2016
... this issue focus on images of men in Arabic literature and television, and a third looks at the role of the “beloved” in the reception of Kurdish Sufi poetry. That article anticipates JMEWS 12:2, our next special issue, which is devoted to intimacy in the Middle East. The cover art for this first...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2014) 10 (2): 52–79.
Published: 01 July 2014
... is that many of the older women with whom I spoke, whether Zaydi or Sunni, accommodated doctrinal contradiction and attended both reli- 54  mn  Journal of Middle East women’s studies  10:2 gious events associated with “popular” or Sufi Islam, especially mawlids (socio-religious...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2014) 10 (2): 167–169.
Published: 01 July 2014
... co-editor (with Nancy Gallagher) of The Gülen Hizmet Movement and its Transnational Activities: Case Stud- ies of Altruistic Activism in Contemporary Islam (BrownWalker Press, 2012), about the pursuits of a Turkish Sufi group at the international level. Pandya’s first essay in the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2007) 3 (2): 118–119.
Published: 01 July 2007
... critique of modern ways. Al-Rawi’s journey across the Middle East can be read as an allegory, like a Sufi path that takes the individual from selfh ood toward selfl ess- ness, as she learns about societies and cultures that make her forget her early selfi sh orientation, obsessions, and concerns...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2006) 2 (1): 95–121.
Published: 01 March 2006
... the 1950s. Throughout her school days, she continued to read both classical and modern Arabic literature, along with Western fiction in translation. Sufi writers such as Muhyi al-Din Muhammad ibn al-Arabi (1165-1240) and Muhammad ibn Abdi-l-Jabbar ibn al-Hasan al-Niffari (d. 970) were later...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2009) 5 (1): 50–79.
Published: 01 March 2009
... espousing a strict, Salafi reformist religious ideology imported from nearby Saudi Arabia, also known as Wahhabism, and those preferring other forms of Islam, including Zaydi Shi‘ism, Yemeni forms of Sufi sm, or other religious or secular ideologies. Salafi religious reformers, many aligned with...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2018) 14 (2): 193–212.
Published: 01 July 2018
... expresses queer masculinities that are unintelligible and unrepresented in Western, Islamic, and postcolonial ideologies. He transcends the dissenting capacity of Sufialism, a literary movement prevalent among Maghrebi Francophone littérateurs that combines Sufi and surrealist themes and practices. I use...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2011) 7 (3): 124–128.
Published: 01 November 2011
... of vernacular culture, focusing on erotic, symbolic, sensual, and non-literal popular traditions, emphasizing in particular Sufi practices and symbolic references to feminine power and author- ity. Ahmed argues that the professionalization and state authorization of the ulema in Pakistan, and...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2016) 12 (3): 455–459.
Published: 01 November 2016
.... Enlightenment comes while shopping for a skirt in a New York dress shop. The saleswoman tells Mernissi she is “too big.” Mernissi asks, “Compared to what?” “Compared . . . to the norm,” answers the saleswoman, and Mernissi has what she describes as a Sufi moment (208–209). Harem slaves to an internalized ideal...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2016) 12 (2): 291–295.
Published: 01 July 2016
... India. The couple returned to their country only after Atatürk’s death in 1938. Edip wrote her autobiography, focused on the silenced voices of the Turkish nation, in English in response to Atatürk’s Nutuk (see also Adıvar 2007 ). Coming from a Mevlevi Sufi family, she was sympathetic to the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2010) 6 (1): 75–102.
Published: 01 March 2010
... evoking the relationship between calligraphy and Sufi sm, the mystical mode of Islam. Th e mystical dimensions of callig- raphy and the historical associations of many calligraphers with various Sufi orders have been well documented (Schimmel 1984; 1992; Khatibi and Sijelmassi 1996). Nevertheless...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2008) 4 (3): 1–11.
Published: 01 November 2008
..., mentally, and morally inferior to men. Some Sufi s, Muslim sects, and ethnic groups had diff erent and more egali- tarian views. Most writings, however, portrayed women as lustful and requiring the control provided by male guardians. Such attitudes, espe- cially among the clergy and the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2018) 14 (2): 152–173.
Published: 01 July 2018
.... 1528) relates the story of a well-respected Shafiʿi ascetic, a Sufi named Muhammad Ibn Salama. During Ramadan in 1506, Ibn Salama had married “an obvious khuntha woman [ imraʾa khuntha wadih ]” and consummated the marriage with her. Alas, the bride had a Maghribi paternal cousin who had wanted to marry...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2013) 9 (2): 80–107.
Published: 01 July 2013
... experiences visions of the Sufi poetess Rabi’a al-‘Adawiyya, whose po- etry is known for its passionate descriptions of her love for God. Khalifa draws on the Sufi poetic tradition to depict the narrator’s devotional ecstasy in visions that combine physical and spiritual experience. The narrator flies...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2005) 1 (2): 25–54.
Published: 01 July 2005
...? Two good friends of mine are Syrian women writers who left Damascus in the 1960s to settle in Beirut. Ghada Samman (b.1942) is one of the Arab world’s best known fiction writers, and Huda Naamani (b.1930) is a highly admired Sufi poet. I had met them just after graduate school, in the sum- mer of...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 87–106.
Published: 01 March 2017
... images, installations, and objects. Some of these were controversial and culturally subversive, including shoe molds covered in stylized Sufi inscriptions. The police claimed that they questioned Lutfi in response to an anonymous accusation in blasphemy, since she dared to put sacred text on such a...