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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2005) 1 (3): 46–72.
Published: 01 November 2005
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2007) 3 (2): 1–30.
Published: 01 July 2007
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2008) 4 (3): 12–30.
Published: 01 November 2008
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2013) 9 (3): 81–107.
Published: 01 November 2013
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2018) 14 (2): 217–220.
Published: 01 July 2018
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2011) 7 (3): 129–131.
Published: 01 November 2011
... “Leisurely Islam: Negotiating Place and Morality in Shi῾ite South Beirut,” funded by the Wenner Gren Founda- tion and the American Council of Learned Societies. Pardis Mahdavi is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Pomona College. Her research interests include gendered labor...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2010) 6 (1): 134–137.
Published: 01 March 2010
... ‘Ashari (Twelver Shi ‘ism) sect, for example, allows a man to have an unlimited number of temporary (mut‘a) wives in addition to his four wives, a practice that is frowned upon by Sunnis. Th e author qualifi es the modern controversy over polygyny, which began in the nineteenth...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2013) 9 (3): 139–142.
Published: 01 November 2013
..., the introduction of literature represents an innovation in a field that has historically shied away from questions of rhetoric and figuration. The dialectic between legal norms and literary form unfolds throughout Motlagh’s book with occasional flashes of brilliance, and is...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2011) 7 (3): 1–5.
Published: 01 November 2011
... Harb, tentatively titled “Leisurely Islam: Negotiating Place and Morality in Shi῾ite South Beirut,” funded by the Wenner Gren Foundation and the American Council of Learned Societies. Dina Al-Kassim is Associate Professor in the Department of Comparative Literature at the School of Humanities...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 71–86.
Published: 01 March 2017
... and Researching Press . Meng Yue , and Dai Jinhua . 1989 . Fu chu li shi di biao—Xian dai nv xing wen xue yan jiu (Emerging from the Surface of History: A Study of Modern Women’s Literature). Zhengzhou : He Nan Ren Min Chu Ban She (Henan People’s Press) . Millett Kate...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2014) 10 (2): 31–51.
Published: 01 July 2014
... Islamic rules. For example, the forbidden parts should not be seen and touched unless—and to the extent—necessary” (Shi- razi 2010a). This fatwa adds an element of shame and corporeal control over the sexed body. The assessment of “necessary” insofar as seeing or touching of the body is...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2005) 1 (1): 6–28.
Published: 01 March 2005
... parts of the Middle East in the latter decades of the twen- tieth century when a new generation of women acting like feminists (in as- serting themselves and their rights as women) shied away from the label, partly, it seems, out of expediency and partly perhaps as a kind of genera- tional protest...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2011) 7 (3): 71–97.
Published: 01 November 2011
.... (Dennis Altman)18 Mustafa, a middle aged Syrian bear who came to meet the tour groups passing through Damascus casually remarked: “Ya’nni, al bears shi tabiy’i mish mithl al gay (Bears are something natural, not like gay Can one say that bear is a broadening of gay identities, a...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2007) 3 (3): 45–74.
Published: 01 November 2007
... reconstitution of local culture: The Iraqi elite used the state as an agent of legal reform, attempting to change family structure and the position of women. The Lebanese elite shied away from legal reform and affirmed the authority of religious institutions over women and the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2008) 4 (3): 58–88.
Published: 01 November 2008