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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2014) 10 (2): 52–79.
Published: 01 July 2014
..., “orthodox” Islam. The past few decades in Sanaa, however, have witnessed a rise in socially-restrictive forms of Salafi Islam, especially among the younger generations, which has had consequences for Yemeni women and their ability to carry out roles in the public sector. On the other hand, the Salafis...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2012) 8 (1): 37–62.
Published: 01 March 2012
..., maker of museum-based memorials at Derb Moulay Cherif, once Casablanca’s torture center during the country’s colonial and post-independence era regimes. The museum project also focuses on Morocco’s largest urban agglomeration, Casablanca, and targets a sector of the city and its inhabitants’ rights...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2013) 9 (3): 1–27.
Published: 01 November 2013
... disadvantaged by neoliberalism and a demographic youth bulge. They were economically excluded by high unemployment and insecure jobs in the informal sector; they were politically excluded by authoritarianism and state repression; and they were socially excluded by the limbo of “waithood,” or prolonged...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2005) 1 (1): 110–146.
Published: 01 March 2005
..., especially among women. In this re- spect, however, Tunisia has fared better than Iran and Jordan because the state has welcomed FDI in sectors that draw on female employment; moreover, Tunisia has a longer and more consistent tradition of women’s rights, and it began liberalization earlier than either...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2013) 9 (3): 28–53.
Published: 01 November 2013
..., which has restructured labor relations in priva- tized textile companies and in the public sector. The beginning of the twenty-first century was a period of ex- ceptional contention and mobilization in Egypt. Over two million Egyptians protesting in the workplace2 formed...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2005) 1 (2): 112–139.
Published: 01 July 2005
... government spending impacts women and gender relations. Key to understanding how the social contract in a particular country/re- gion is actually implemented is an examination of both the management of the public sector and the structure of the formal safety net. The term safety...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2009) 5 (2): 101–104.
Published: 01 July 2009
... of her interviews, al-Jawaheri reveals how sanctions largely devalued women’s formal-sector work. In particular, decreasing job opportunities in the public sector, the withdrawal of benefi ts such as workplace childcare facilities, and the falling value of wages due to infl ation...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2006) 2 (2): 143–146.
Published: 01 July 2006
... emphasizes a point that is echoed elsewhere in the book— for many social reasons, the public sector constitutes the main em- ployment venue for educated MENA women. Thus, SAP measures of reducing the size of the public sector have left women unemployed rather than directing them...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2019) 15 (2): 226–228.
Published: 01 July 2019
... the public and visible economic activities of women in Egypt’s globalized textile sector. Drawing on fieldwork conducted in 2004—almost the peak of neoliberalism—Leila Zaki Chakravarti scrutinizes the economic environment within which the firm competes; the ways factory management manipulates the categories...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2007) 3 (3): 99–102.
Published: 01 November 2007
... a challenge in many ways as yet insufficiently addressed by civil bodies. Research papers by various experts point toward numerous indicators: 1. Low level of socio-economic indicators. 2. Restriction of personal liberty and autonomy. 3. Insignificant public sector employment. 4. Gender...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2010) 6 (2): 1–30.
Published: 01 July 2010
... of institutional changes that limited women’s access to formal offi ces of power, elevated STACEY PHILBRICK YADAV  9 their role within “feminized” fi elds and disciplines (especially education and health sectors), and increased their level of segregation from men...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2013) 9 (1): 127–130.
Published: 01 March 2013
... of abuses experienced by individuals and groups across many sectors, Mahdavi points to how traf- ficking discourses focus almost exclusively on transnational sex workers in the UAE. These discourses are predicated on gendered, racialized, and Orientalist assumptions—where women, mostly young and from...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2008) 4 (1): 132–135.
Published: 01 March 2008
... Kuttab’s fi nal chapter investigates the signifi cance of the work of women, “whose participation rate in the labor market [most in the service sector] has never exceeded 12 percent since the Israeli occupation of 1967” (234), in sustaining household survival. She demonstrates how...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2012) 8 (2): 78–101.
Published: 01 July 2012
... occupation (Rosenfeld 2002, 524). It focuses on the occupier’s policies to control people and the economy by subordinating labor and resources to the needs of the occupying force, and undermining the public sector and institutions of the occupied. This perfectly describes the relationship...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2006) 2 (1): 1–32.
Published: 01 March 2006
..., or what I have called elsewhere the popular sector, emphasizes the ways in which families are intimately and extensively involved in almost all realms of social, political, moral, and economic life, such as educating children, childrearing, securing employment, negotiating...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2005) 1 (3): 20–45.
Published: 01 November 2005
... 2001:230).1 Meanwhile, working- class women worked inside and outside their homes within the agricul- tural and industrial sectors and under much harsher conditions. While peasant women were seldom paid for work because it was considered to be part of family labor, urban women workers...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2014) 10 (2): 135–151.
Published: 01 July 2014
...). However, Omani women are only 27 percent of the total native workforce, and their relative composi- tion is lower in the private sector (19 percent) than in the government 138  mn  Journal of Middle East women’s studies  10:2 sector (37 percent) (Ministry of National Economy 2011). Although...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2007) 3 (2): 86–109.
Published: 01 July 2007
...) and a defender of women’s right of access to eco- nomic resources. In a fairly extensive interview, he expressed concern about women’s property rights in the agricultural sector, refl ecting the interests of his largely rural constituency.3 Th e bill was blocked, however, by the Council of Guardians...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2021) 17 (3): 395–422.
Published: 01 November 2021
... . Rittersberger-Tılıç Helga , and Kalaycıoğlu Sibel . 2012 . “ Child and Elder Care Providers: Women in Informal Sector .” In Gender and Society in Turkey: The Impact of Neoliberal Policies, Political Islam, and EU Accession , edited by Dedeoğlu Saniye and Elveren Adem Yavuz , 189 – 205...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2020) 16 (1): 19–40.
Published: 01 March 2020
... concerns about the free market materialize. The country abandoned Nasserism’s state-centric approach to gender equality, largely built on the public sector and women’s labor within it. Granted, the shift to the private sector opened up opportunities for some women, but this was a small minority. Moreover...