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regime

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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2007) 3 (3): 75–98.
Published: 01 November 2007
... political regimes have assigned to the veil meanings corresponding to their own ideologies. Through imposed unveiling and re-veiling, these regimes have constructed an ideal image of Iranian women and in turn of Iran as a modern or an Islamic country. This essentialized singular image has led to the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2006) 2 (2): 60–85.
Published: 01 July 2006
...Abdelkader Cheref When, in the early 1990s, Ali Benhadj, the most media-exposed Algerian opponent and the second-in-command in the Islamic Salvation Front (FIS), declared that “Louisa Hanoune is the only man in the Algerian opposition,” he meant to deride the rest of the opposition to the regime in...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2007) 3 (3): 45–74.
Published: 01 November 2007
... sufficient explanation of how these two seemingly contradictory aspects interrelate. I argue, using ethnographic data, that more attention than that paid so far should be given to structural tensions between the various regimes that compose the Israeli-Palestinian gender order, notably the family, the state...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2012) 8 (1): 92–114.
Published: 01 March 2012
...Andrea Fischer-Tahir In 1988 the Iraqi regime launched the Anfal campaigns against the Kurdish peshmerga and their civil supporters in the rural areas. This article investigates narrations about Anfal constructed by peshmerga ten years after the events. It compares the memoirs of a leading...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2015) 11 (2): 139–160.
Published: 01 July 2015
... that they construct. The article also explores the “regimes of veiling” that regulate the practice in Amman and how they enable this particular articulation of veiling. I found the women’s reasoning for fashionable veiling to be more about gendered cultural codes than religious mandates. Copyright...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2016) 12 (1): 50–67.
Published: 01 March 2016
... in Syrian melodrama connoted the rise of more equal gender relations, which symbolized a pluralistic political order. Amid the uprising, those outwardly embracing the regime narrative insist that they are focusing on societal norms rather than politics. This study is based on analysis of miniseries...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2014) 10 (2): 1–30.
Published: 01 July 2014
... analysis of the much celebrated Family Code and its two main goals-“doing justice to women” and “preserving men’s dignity”-and of the regime’s ambivalent discourse on gender equality as defined by the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) paints a more realistic...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2011) 7 (2): 56–88.
Published: 01 July 2011
... chosen to focus on what Edward Said called the Question of Palestine—a well funded agenda that enables them to avoid addressing the community-based concerns of the disenfranchised Mizrahim. Mizrahi communities, however, silence their own feminists as these activists attempt to challenge the regime or...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2012) 8 (2): 26–50.
Published: 01 July 2012
...” through the daily work of intervention, I suggest that girl initiatives of this kind constitute a transnational “regime of care” centered on the protection and politicization of particular kinds of adolescent life in Egypt and the broader Arab world. Rania Kassab Sweis holds the Qatar Post-Doctoral...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2012) 8 (3): 63–88.
Published: 01 November 2012
... the printing press and political reforms during the late Ottoman Empire and the early Turkish republic silenced sexual discourses, television brought them back as part of the new gender regime and disseminated a gender “deviance” model of homosexuality. Against this background, the rest of the article...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2014) 10 (3): 109–124.
Published: 01 November 2014
... that there is no gender equality in Arab society in Israel, a conviction stronger among male teachers. Transition of Arab society from traditional to modern society has not eliminated the patriarchal regime. Improved education of women and their professional promotion have not ensured gender equality...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2007) 3 (3): 1–20.
Published: 01 November 2007
.... Reasons for this surgery are examined, including physician avarice, masculinity expectations within homosocially competitive fertility regimes, and husbands' desires to share the burden of reproductive suffering with beloved wives. It is argued that within the Middle East, men as well as women are heavily...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2011) 7 (2): 1–26.
Published: 01 July 2011
... histories of the biographer that have not received their due attention. It argues that Abdel Rahman’s independent views regarding the role of religion and modernity in colonial and postcolonial societies made her the unlikely heroine of the post-1952 republican regime. These views also shaped her...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2012) 8 (1): 37–62.
Published: 01 March 2012
..., maker of museum-based memorials at Derb Moulay Cherif, once Casablanca’s torture center during the country’s colonial and post-independence era regimes. The museum project also focuses on Morocco’s largest urban agglomeration, Casablanca, and targets a sector of the city and its inhabitants’ rights as...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2013) 9 (3): 1–27.
Published: 01 November 2013
... before it, creatively adopted a non-hierarchical model of collective action that was organically suited to the vast informal and subterranean networks already dominant within Egyptian life. Young women and men risked their lives pursuing regime change, and one of the master frames of the uprisings that...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 189–193.
Published: 01 March 2017
... appearances and voices of the street. In Istanbul, the street used to be predominantly a space of representation for the republican ideals of the Kemalist regime on the one hand, and a space of struggle for dissident groups on the other. The Justice and Development Party (AKP) has challenged the exclusionary...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2015) 11 (3): 343–345.
Published: 01 November 2015
... regime comes to bear as a grammar of legitimacy and power. This regime’s grammar is not better, more consensus-based, or less coercive than the preceding neoliberal regime. However, there is a lot that is new about it. It governs through new fusions of morality and security politics. It uses danger and...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2006) 2 (3): 102–104.
Published: 01 November 2006
... legal regime contains Islamic elements but is subject to legislative modifi cation; in Palestine, where a Muslim population had limited elements of self-government post-Oslo, and wrestled with the role of shari‘a in the law that was to be made by the Palestinian Authority; and in the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2009) 5 (1): 111–113.
Published: 01 March 2009
... OF MIDDLE EAST WOMEN’S STUDIES 5:1 “commissioned criticism.” Th e Asad regime, she argues, has attempted to co-opt—even sponsor—a body of dissident literature, fi lm, and vi- sual art, providing a safety valve, or tanuff us (breathing), which cooke artfully links to the sahat al...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2016) 12 (3): 303–305.
Published: 01 November 2016
... prominent among the protesters who staged peaceful demonstrations in early 2011 calling for meaningful reforms of the authoritarian Assad regime. As the government’s security forces’ violent responses to those demonstrations drove protesters off the streets, militarization escalated. As so often happens...