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recognition

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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2015) 11 (1): 24–41.
Published: 01 March 2015
... sciences; some of her responses appear in Collection of Little Pieces ( Jamiʿ al-shatat ; Amin 1965 ). Amin’s recognition as a scholarly authority of high rank is supported by the fact that men scholars and ulema traveled far to discuss Islamic scholarship with her (Humayuni 2009–10 , 61–67...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2008) 4 (1): 83–106.
Published: 01 March 2008
... across national boundaries, in seeking recognition from the international women’s movement, and above all in articulating a uniquely “Eastern” framework in which to ground women’s rights, the delegates tried to create an autonomous women’s movement that was allied with but independent from both Middle...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2015) 11 (2): 199–215.
Published: 01 July 2015
... self writing disidentification recognition To those who played their role in my life and slipped away in the flood of time Tuqan’s dedication in Rihla Jabaliyya (1985, 7) The 1985 autobiography of the Palestinian poet Fadwa Tuqan (1917–2003), Rihla Jabaliyya, Rihla Saʿba: Sira Dhatiyya...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2011) 7 (2): 123–125.
Published: 01 July 2011
... knowledge. She discusses her own struggle to gain official recognition as muftiyaa (someone who can deliver religious edicts, or fatwas) through the Grand Council in Egypt. The process requires voting by an all-male board, and her ap- plication received only one vote. She has since...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2017) 13 (3): 479–482.
Published: 01 November 2017
... recognition. In the past some feminist scholars critiqued the politicized rhetoric of Western governments and institutions whose recognition of “the Muslim woman” seemed limited to appeals to save her from her “culture” or the men in her society. They argued that this depiction of Muslim women as victims...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2016) 12 (1): 1.
Published: 01 March 2016
... philosopher. Living between three disciplinary worlds and the three continents of Asia, Europe, and North America, Adnan draws on multiple sources of inspiration and binds them with color for exquisite paintings that have garnered praise and recognition from around the world. She has painted stories with...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2017) 13 (3): 461–468.
Published: 01 November 2017
... achieving social recognition and legal equality for homosexual couples, on the one hand, and the possibility of rendering other sexual arrangements illegible, on the other. Do you still have that concern, and if so how, politically and practically, can it be resolved, and what would be transnational and...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2015) 11 (3): 354–358.
Published: 01 November 2015
..., including gender. Influential Tunisian women cartoonists include Noha Habeieb, Nadia Khiari, and Lilia Halloul. The latter was the first woman to earn wide recognition in cartooning after the revolution for addressing mainstream politics and criticizing the marginalization of women. This piece...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2015) 11 (1): 111–113.
Published: 01 March 2015
... acknowledgment of this solidarity from PACBI. Yet Schulman’s articulation of reciprocity through a rhetoric of recognition—a public “coming out”—is problematic. Such an approach both values and imposes a Western language of gay liberation that identifies LGBT struggle with particular forms of publicness...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2015) 11 (2): 244–245.
Published: 01 July 2015
..., and exposed to defamation and the threat of being fired. We are deprived of the freedom to move around. We cannot obtain legal recognition of the organization, and it is difficult to obtain the necessary approvals for our activities in some cities. We lack funding, because we are not bound by an...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2017) 13 (3): 451–452.
Published: 01 November 2017
... other’s presence and how much the group affected the identity they were portraying to the world. From this recognition the idea of photographing each girl by herself emerged. The room was a metaphor, an extension of the girl, but also the girl seemed to be part of the room, to fit in just like...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2014) 10 (3): 140–142.
Published: 01 November 2014
... Association for Middle East Women’s Studies; an award “In Recognition and Appreciation of Her 50 Years of Commitment and Valuable Contributions in Support of the Sudanese Women’s Movement” from Salmmah Women’s Resource Cen- ter (Khartoum, Sudan); and a “Life-Time of Distinguished Scholarship” award...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2018) 14 (3): 292–313.
Published: 01 November 2018
... delinquency among the children (Bargach 2002 ; Barraud 2010 , 7–12; Bettahar 2005–6 , 8; Schlumpf 2016 ; Zantout 2011 ). Seeking paternal recognition of unwed women’s children through the courts may involve the risk of reinforcing patriarchal systems in a “devil’s bargain” with state laws and...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2014) 10 (3): 1–7.
Published: 01 November 2014
... conference in recognition of my Middle East gender scholarship and service to JMEWS. In addition, this special issue includes the 2013 JMEWS graduate prize- winning essay by sociologist Nazanin Shahrokni (Harvard University; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley). It also features a recognition...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2015) 11 (1): 108–110.
Published: 01 March 2015
... self-reflection, and constant recognition of our common humanity, a humanity subjected to different forces and expressed in different registers” (227). This book is a welcome and important step in that direction. ...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2015) 11 (3): 350–353.
Published: 01 November 2015
..., bosses, landowners, and heads of families. When feminism is reduced to a critique of modernity, we ignore the importance of women’s economic independence based on wage earning and recognition as individuals outside the family. The particulars of patriarchy in Turkey, moreover, are based as much on the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2016) 12 (3): 450–452.
Published: 01 November 2016
... is an unusual recognition of the performativity and plural possibilities of masculinities not linked to particular bodies. It was not my purpose to demonstrate that marjala is used to exclusively represent either negative or positive masculine traits but to argue for its potential as a more...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 135–137.
Published: 01 March 2017
... lives of these nonelites, but it does us no good to romanticize them, either. What past do we long for, and what are the implications of nostalgia? Using Abbassid homoerotic poetry to make claims for recognition in the present, for example, has its political power but also its flip sides, which should...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 186–188.
Published: 01 March 2017
... the immediacy of armed forces. However, despite the resemblance of the experience, the possibility of women’s recognition of each other’s history of injuries and coming together for peace is rather grim. Within the rhetoric of unity and democracy, the embodied presence and the language of women on...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2006) 2 (3): 109–111.
Published: 01 November 2006
... press. Th ese include formal portraits of prominent women activ- ists and photos chronicling their various activities. Th ese are arranged thematically rather than chronologically, a recognition by the authors that “developments seldom occur in historical narrative’s linear terms” (4...