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prophet

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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2011) 7 (2): 1–26.
Published: 01 July 2011
...Mervat F. Hatem This paper examines the work of Egyptian ‘A’isha Abdel Rahman (who acquired the pen name of Bint al-Shati’ in the 1930s) on the tarajim (biographies) of women of the prophetic households published in the 1950s and the 1960s. It begins by shedding light on personal and intellectual...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2005) 1 (2): 1–24.
Published: 01 July 2005
... Allah Nuriyani, “was offered to this world by her Ffather, the Prophet Muhammad, as the complete example of womanhood.” In fulfilling her maternal duties and upholding her religion, Nuriyani asserted, Fatima performed her obligations with steadfastness and decorum, all the while guarding her...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2008) 4 (3): 131–134.
Published: 01 November 2008
... individual’s relationship with the Qur’an, which, in her view, supersedes considerations of history and previous generations of interpreters. Th is sometimes leads her to the fairly radical step of questioning the Prophet’s behavior. For instance, the Prophet is reported to have said, “We...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2016) 12 (2): 268–274.
Published: 01 July 2016
...Dena Al-Adeeb Copyright © 2016 by the Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2016 I returned to Iraq in March 2004 during ʿAshura, the commemoration rituals of the martyrdom of the grandson of the Prophet Muhammad, Imam Husayn, in the seventh century. It was a year after the US...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2010) 6 (1): 117–128.
Published: 01 March 2010
... defamation, but what aroused the religious feeling? Th e sexual character of the Danish cartoons as well as their fi xation on the masculinity of the Prophet were particularly provocative and underscore the message that public expression of collec- tive piety is in itself an off ense in the political...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2010) 6 (1): 134–137.
Published: 01 March 2010
.... Th e tribe of Quraysh, for instance, did not practice polygyny prior to the advent of Islam. Th e best example is the Prophet’s 25-year-long monogamous marriage to Khadija. Th e author contends that as polygyny was widely practiced among the Jewish community in Medina, the new Muslims...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2011) 7 (3): 124–128.
Published: 01 November 2011
... zones, and mourning rituals as spaces that destabilize, estrange, and reveal. Challenging the sensi- tive boundary between popular culture and theological interpretations of revelation, Ruth Roded’s chapter critically explores Orientalist treat- ments of the Prophet Muhammad’s virility and...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2016) 12 (1): 68–87.
Published: 01 March 2016
... influential minority in Kurdistan. It claimed to focus on the moral reform of the Muslim community, calling Muslims to reject all forms of illicit innovation and return to the perfect model set by the Prophet Muhammad. Many harbored suspicions that it was only a matter of time before these “Saudi-funded...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 132–134.
Published: 01 March 2017
... they heard that the prophet Muhammad was dead, and the first caliph Abu Bakr reportedly ordered that they be cruelly punished. This tale expresses fears about the possible resurgence of paganism, uses female figures to represent the jahiliyya as diametrically opposed to Islam, and provides an object...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2015) 11 (1): 24–41.
Published: 01 March 2015
... ), principles of law ( usul ), Quranic exegesis ( tafsir ), traditions from the Prophet (hadith), logic ( mantiq ), philosophy (  falsafa ), and mysticism ( ʿirfan ), with Ayatollah Hajj Mir Sayyid ʿAli Najafabadi (d. 1943), her first professor. He had a significant impact on her formation. Amin studied with...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2009) 5 (2): 104–106.
Published: 01 July 2009
... ambiguous proofs that remain rooted in values of those who lived in the time of the Prophet’s Companions and have acquired immutable status, that are the subject of this study. Certain rul- ings within classical Islamic law that continue to thrive under the claim of settled precedents...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2011) 7 (2): 120–122.
Published: 01 July 2011
... not contain a verse that forbids lesbianism. This argument is not necessarily inconsistent, but Shirazi states in another context that there is no record of women being lashed for any reason during Prophet Muhammad’s lifetime and asks why the practice should be common- place today (197). To...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2011) 7 (2): 27–55.
Published: 01 July 2011
... WOMEN’S STUDIES Vol. 7, No. 2 (Spring 2011) © 2011 27 28  mn  JOURNAL OF MIDDLE EAST WOMEN’S STUDIES  7:2 event was titled “Show me the Prophet” and was organized partly in response to the Muhammad caricature affair of 2006. Taking...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2010) 6 (1): 75–102.
Published: 01 March 2010
.... Evi- dence suggests, however, that it was not entirely uncommon for women to practice calligraphy. Indeed, the Prophet Muhammad reportedly encouraged women to practice and teach writing (Schimmel 1984, 46). Scattered references indicate that women practiced Islamic calligraphy from the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2005) 1 (2): 89–111.
Published: 01 July 2005
... government’s Islamist political structure and several Islamist and Wahibbist organizations such as the Ansar al-Sunna (“followers of the traditions of the Prophet feminist activists been courageous in raising these issues. Although the pharaonic, but not sunna, form of FGC had been...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2013) 9 (2): 58–79.
Published: 01 July 2013
... mourning with her own personal mechanisms for coping with grief (69). Also noteworthy in this context is the description of the hadith, or the exemplary actions and sayings of the Prophet Muhammad, as Sam- mar translates a hadith as part of her work: A sacred hadith is, as to its meaning...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2009) 5 (2): 101–104.
Published: 01 July 2009
..., i.e. implicit and ambiguous proofs that remain rooted in values of those who lived in the time of the Prophet’s Companions and have acquired immutable status, that are the subject of this study. Certain rul- ings within classical Islamic law that continue to thrive under the claim...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2012) 8 (2): 113–116.
Published: 01 July 2012
... doctrine, Ahmed insisted instead on history. She argued that there were two foundational tendencies in the teachings of the prophet Muhammad that were in tension with one another: one was a vision of the spiritual and moral equality of all humans; the other was a hierarchical structure...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2012) 8 (2): 116–119.
Published: 01 July 2012
... foundational tendencies in the teachings of the prophet Muhammad that were in tension with one another: one was a vision of the spiritual and moral equality of all humans; the other was a hierarchical structure of gender relations. In the course of Middle Eastern history (especially in the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2006) 2 (2): 143–146.
Published: 01 July 2006
... internal Iranian political situation as viewed perhaps through a classic analytical nongovernmental secondary source such as Roy Mottahedeh’s The Mantle of the Prophet. The suggestions above of a few paths not traveled in Helen of Tūs should be seen as invitational rather than deeply critical...