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postcolonial female agency

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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2015) 11 (2): 179–198.
Published: 01 July 2015
... embellish what she told, to captivate her listener and leave him entranced” (80). postcolonial female agency Leila Abouzeid Arabic autobiography Moroccan autobiography Arab women’s writing Return to Childhood unfolds the ongoing process of subjectivity and identity in relation to various...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2012) 8 (2): 110–112.
Published: 01 July 2012
...Alyson E. Jones 110  mn  Journal of Middle East women’s studies  8:2 that coincided with its further gendering as displaced, mostly female, Shi‘a villagers replaced a declining Maronite workforce. Chapter 5 lays bare the state’s own gender bias regarding women’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2016) 12 (1): 88–92.
Published: 01 March 2016
... practices of 2008–9, Maaike Voorhoeve’s Gender and Divorce Law in North Africa highlights the emancipatory reading of judicial law by Tunisian female judges. This is a significant token of agency in a region where law and politics are imbricated (Charrad 2001 ). Intervening in law to improve it is...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2012) 8 (2): 113–116.
Published: 01 July 2012
...Edwige Tamalet Talbayev Gender and Identity in North Africa: Postcolonialism and Feminism in Maghrebi Women’s Literature , Cheref Abdelkader . London; New York : Tauris Academic Studies , 2010 . 206 pages. ISBN 978-1-84885-449-9 . Copyright © 2012 Association for Middle East...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2019) 15 (1): 75–94.
Published: 01 March 2019
... religion to the other. Rather, they lead the female characters to transform ideas of identity, survival, rebellion, and sense of agency as they negotiate the challenges of immigration. Lalami’s unique intervention perceives women’s agency within female conceptions of Islam that transcend the reduction of...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2006) 2 (3): 1–21.
Published: 01 November 2006
...Cyrus Schayegh This article analyzes one of the first book-length Iranian treatises on female criminality, Qadisih Hijāzi’s Barrisi-yi jarā’im-i zan dar Irān (1962), to show how in the eyes of contemporary Iranian cultural critics and social scientists, female criminality was prefigured by gender...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2015) 11 (1): 80–97.
Published: 01 March 2015
... patriarchal power and cooperating through storytelling. Both narratives reflect their own forms of “multiple critique.” Tomorrow confronts the exploitation of the working class in postcolonial Morocco but does so in a way that disguises a frontal challenge to the masculinist context of the 1960s and the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2011) 7 (2): 1–26.
Published: 01 July 2011
... histories of the biographer that have not received their due attention. It argues that Abdel Rahman’s independent views regarding the role of religion and modernity in colonial and postcolonial societies made her the unlikely heroine of the post-1952 republican regime. These views also shaped her...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2018) 14 (1): 3–24.
Published: 01 March 2018
... . Weidman Amanda J. 2006 . Singing the Classical, Voicing the Modern: The Postcolonial Politics of Music in South India . Durham, NC : Duke University Press . Weidman Amanda J. 2007 . “ Stage Goddesses and Studio Divas in South India: On Agency and the Politics of Voice .” In Words...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2010) 6 (3): 58–90.
Published: 01 November 2010
... internal debates about the representation of the female body and concepts of modesty. Central to this is the problem of what Muslim looks like, or what looks Muslim. The challenges faced by Muslim style intermediaries in staging a dressed body recognizable to readers as Muslim parallel those faced by the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2012) 8 (2): 51–77.
Published: 01 July 2012
... modern law and society as both a promise of lifelong companionship and a private institution that threatens to close a woman off from her other relationships, especially those with her female friends, and thereby from her means of engaging in the ethical work of developing a pious self. It also reads...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2007) 3 (2): 86–109.
Published: 01 July 2007
...Roksana Bahramitash This paper reviews the experience of Iranian women during the reform era (1997–2004) from a postcolonial feminist theoretical perspective, and challenges the mainstream literature on women in the Muslim world in its tendency to portray them as passive victims. Iranian women...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2011) 7 (3): 36–70.
Published: 01 November 2011
... masculinities, this article creates a larger map of discourses and methods, drawing upon studies of coloniality and gender in and from the global South. This mapping puts masculinity studies into dialogue with critiques of liberalism and security governance and with work in postcolonial queer theory, public...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2013) 9 (2): 58–79.
Published: 01 July 2013
...Shirin Edwin This article examines the tenor of Islamic spirituality in Leila Aboulela’s The Translator (1999). By contrasting my analysis with those studies that lay excessive emphasis on the novel as symbolic of an East versus West theory, as well as a conflict between colonial and postcolonial...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2013) 9 (2): 32–57.
Published: 01 July 2013
...  41 allegorical reading of The Shirt of Flame, one in which, however, female agency is sublimated to male authority. Cook, an English colonialist who is described as believing in the “natives under the heels of the victor” (45), is an embodiment of the colonial encounter (secular...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2012) 8 (2): 26–50.
Published: 01 July 2012
...Rania Kassab Sweis Bridging literature on modern governance with youth subjectivity, this article examines the globalization of female youth in contemporary Egypt through transnational humanitarian interventions. Drawing on over twenty-seven months of ethnographic fieldwork conducted in Egypt and...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2007) 3 (3): 45–74.
Published: 01 November 2007
... is intended to place their agency in finer perspective, through elaborating the structural setting within which it is made possible. Amalia Sa‘ar (Ph.D., Boston University) is a cultural anthropologist. Her ongoing research concerns Israeli Palestinians, with a focus on gender politics and...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2007) 3 (1): 106–127.
Published: 01 March 2007
... in the local context is to elaborate, develop, and disseminate translations of gender that enable agency. The article also explores some of the sites of resistance to the field in Egypt and in the Arab world, including various Islamist discourses. Samia Mehrez is Associate Professor of Arabic...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2012) 8 (3): 63–88.
Published: 01 November 2012
... analyzes the metaphor of the Internet as a digital closet as it relates to collegiate lesbian and gay activism. The conclusion reflects on the significance and functions of this media metaphor for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and transsexual agency and subjectivities in Turkey, suggesting similar...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2016) 12 (1): 99–101.
Published: 01 March 2016
... production in conversation with global market demands substantially further our knowledge of postcolonial Islamic societies and the use of dress to validate indigenous agency. Moroccan adult female dress becomes a canvas on which to observe competing ideological traditions, including the cultural anxiety of...