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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2017) 13 (3): 416–437.
Published: 01 November 2017
... transnational media popular music Iran veiling and piety political participation In 2011 Iranian pop icon Googoosh began a new venture through the London-based Manoto 1 satellite television station Googoosh Music Academy (GMA), a pop music talent competition in which nonprofessional contestants...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2005) 1 (3): 122–125.
Published: 01 November 2005
... that has been a basic reason for the division of society into kh∂ssa and ῾∂mma” (214). A process of “cultural revivalism” (179) emerged, which has been manifested in the increasing importance of Islamic discourses, the spread of colloquialism, and the integration of the ῾∂mma forms in popular music...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2021) 17 (2): 197–219.
Published: 01 July 2021
... predicament is that dabke , despite its ubiquity across social strata, retains associations with rural (and for some, backward) ways of life. He is embarrassed by his inability to abstain from dancing when he hears popular music because its lack of refinement ostensibly clashes with his cultivated lifestyle...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2011) 7 (2): 27–55.
Published: 01 July 2011
... aspects of her life.24 Kandemir never intended to leave the larger stage of her previous life (that is, the public sphere at large); rather she set out to play a different role and follow a different script. In the process she moved from the sphere of popular music to the Muslim public...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2020) 16 (2): 144–164.
Published: 01 July 2020
... is particularly noteworthy here is the formation of two separate layers in Iranian popular culture. On the one hand, popular culture—namely, music and dance—is heavily censored and hidden in Iranian society and presented in the public sphere only once it has been subjected to the strict regulations...
FIGURES | View All (6)
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2021) 17 (1): 137–146.
Published: 01 March 2021
... for understanding the construction and reproduction of dominant gender norms, as well as their contestation and subversion. This was especially apparent in the wake of the Arab uprisings, when different forms of creative expression—such as graffiti and independent music—flourished, and popular media openly...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2005) 1 (3): 133–138.
Published: 01 November 2005
... in the book’s introduction. In chapter one, “History and Economy of Women in Sufi Ritual,” BOOK REVIEWS  135 the gendered nature of the genres of Sufi musical performance is high- lighted. Abbas observes that qawwali, popularized on the world music...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2020) 16 (2): 209–212.
Published: 01 July 2020
..., and thick eyebrows. With the rise of a pro-Western modern state under Reza Shah Pahlavi, the 1930s and 1940s sparked women’s public emergence in music and performing arts in Iran. Many female musicians, singers, and dancers gained fame and popularity through public performances in famous theater halls...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2012) 8 (3): 139–142.
Published: 01 November 2012
..., and its market in the Arab world, with its growing popularity of music videos. The transmission of music videos on satellite music channels at the beginning of the century, primarily, as well as the Internet, more recently, with sites such as YouTube and its circulation of music videos...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2010) 6 (2): 86–114.
Published: 01 July 2010
... do ventre [belly dance] first “Wpublicly performed in Brazil?” asked the country’s popular bel- ly dance newsletter, Oriente, Encanto e Magia (Orient, Enchantment and Magic), in 2001.1 It found that a Brazilian woman of European de- scent, accompanied by male Syrian...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2011) 7 (3): 36–70.
Published: 01 November 2011
... is. (Annie Rebehak Gardner, “The Role of Masculinity in the Egyptian Uprising,” Canonball blog, February 10, 2011)4 any observers initially responded to the emergence of popular up- Mrisings that spread from Tunisia to Egypt to Libya and beyond in 2011 with shocked incomprehension...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2012) 8 (2): 110–112.
Published: 01 July 2012
... sources are similarly crucial: labor union and politi- cal party records, in addition to French and Lebanese archival documents, memoirs and personal letters, the press, oral histories, and aspects of popular culture. However, Abisaab could have discussed more explicitly the shifting...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2014) 10 (3): 62–86.
Published: 01 November 2014
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2016) 12 (2): 181–202.
Published: 01 July 2016
... depilation,” and “Japanese manicure.” A white ornamental folding screen separates the front of the room, reserved for makeup and hairstyling, from the back, where manicures and pedicures are provided in a special chair. The TV above the entrance is usually set to the popular music channel KralPop and plays...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2017) 13 (1): 128–131.
Published: 01 March 2017
... with the modern Arab world and its diasporas. The largest number of papers presented at the conference dealt either with Arabic erotological texts or with explicitly erotic creative works. This cluster included papers on sex manuals, classical Arabic poetry, Egyptian pop music, and love treatises. The papers...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2019) 15 (2): 135–156.
Published: 01 July 2019
...Mejdulene B. Shomali Abstract This article analyzes two popular Golden Era belly-dance films, Sigara wa Kass ( A Cigarette and a Glass , 1955) and Habibi al Asmar ( My Dark Darling , 1958), through concepts of queer spectatorship, queer time and space, homoerotic triangulation, and queer...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2009) 5 (3): 36–53.
Published: 01 November 2009
... provided drinks, photography, live music, and rented chairs. Some 2,500 guests, including both men and women (seated separately), attended the wedding meal, which cost approximately USD 10,000 (for food including some 700 kilos of meat, and cooks and clean-up). Th e collective proces- sion (zaff...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2010) 6 (3): 91–117.
Published: 01 November 2010
... emergence of a whole host of ways of being a pious Muslim in Indonesia. From Ra- madan television specials, to popular music, to Qur’anic recitation clubs, to Adzhan ringtones, to Islamic housing complexes, to beautifully ornate dress, being Muslim very quickly became something that one...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2019) 15 (3): 307–329.
Published: 01 November 2019
... of the Egyptian popular culture, later joined by satellite television. After taking power, the Free Officers, led until 1954 by Muhammad Naguib, announced a nascent era of social justice in Egypt. The majority of the artists in the entertainment industry, many of them from humble origins, were enthusiastic...
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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2007) 3 (1): 128–130.
Published: 01 March 2007
..., culture, music, and entertainment despite economic deterioration, repression, and later on, war and occupation. Ditmars’ book is also the story of a return. The Canadian journalist of Lebanese origin first visited Iraq in 1997. By that time Iraq had already been subjected...