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mizrahi

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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2016) 12 (2): 264–266.
Published: 01 July 2016
...Adi Kuntsman Wrapped in the Flag of Israel: Mizrahi Single Mothers and Bureaucratic Torture . Lavie Smadar . New York : Berghahn , 2014 . 216 pages. isbn 9781782382225 Copyright © 2016 by the Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2016 Smadar Lavie’s Wrapped in the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2011) 7 (2): 56–88.
Published: 01 July 2011
...Smadar Lavie This paper analyzes the failure of Israel’s Ashkenazi (Jewish, of European, Yiddish-speaking origin) feminist peace movement to work within the context of Middle East demographics, cultures, and histories and, alternately, the inabilities of the Mizrahi (Oriental) feminist movement to...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2006) 2 (3): 71–101.
Published: 01 November 2006
... discrimination (against Mizrahim in general and against Mizrahi girls in particular) presents a special case of exclusionary social practices in the context of the Middle East. It owes its motivating and legitimizing force to social constructions exhibiting a unique reproduction of the dichotomy between the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2016) 12 (3): 460.
Published: 01 November 2016
... Copyright © 2016 by the Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2016 Erratum for Adi Kuntsman, review of Wrapped in the Flag of Israel: Mizrahi Single Mothers and Bureaucratic Torture , by Smadar Lavie, Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies 12, no. 2 (2016): 264–66 . On page...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 138–140.
Published: 01 March 2017
... as a Mizrahi Jew adds an interesting facet to the research, positively and negatively. While she gained unprecedented access to women activists in the settler movement and Shas, as well as the Islamic Movement based on her Mizrahi roots and ability to speak Arabic, she could not access Hamas...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2017) 13 (3): 395–415.
Published: 01 November 2017
... predominantly policed by Mizrahi Jews, Ethiopian Jews, and Druze, or Christian Palestinian soldiers. Mizrahi soldiers are often sent to do the “dirty work” of protecting an Ashkenazi elite in Israel (Mazor and Mehager 2016 ). Even though young temple activists are often arrested for attempting to pray or...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2013) 9 (3): 81–107.
Published: 01 November 2013
... the spiritual guidance of Israel’s former Sephardic Chief Rabbi, Ovadia Yosef, and the influential Ashkenazi Rabbi Shakh. In its 1984 national election campaign, Shas’s mobilization efforts fo- cused on Haredi Mizrahi Jews who were discriminated against in ultra-Orthodox Ashkenazi educational...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2015) 11 (1): 3–23.
Published: 01 March 2015
... the lowest income category; of Moroccans specifically, 51 percent were blue-collar in 1961 and 54 percent as late as 1981 (Ben-Rafael and Sharot 1991 , 30, 32, 67). Gaps between Mizrahi and Ashkenazi women, too, have only grown over time (Mizrachi 2013 , 15). Moroccans’ relatively low economic...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2019) 15 (1): 24–47.
Published: 01 March 2019
.... The theory suggests that retraditionalization among women classified as Western tends to be unconscious and unmarked, while that among women classified as Eastern tends to be conscious and marked. If so, it is likely that Israelis overestimate Mizrahi/Ashkenazi and Palestinian/Jewish differences in...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2018) 14 (1): 45–67.
Published: 01 March 2018
..., doctors, and politicians, and that the state’s valorization of certain mothers led to the exclusion of others who were deemed immoral or unhygienic. Furthermore, Smadar Lavie’s intimate autoethnography of Mizrahi single mothers in Israel demonstrates how racial and sexual stereotypes about Mizrahi women...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2007) 3 (3): 45–74.
Published: 01 November 2007
... legitimize different positions occupied by the major Jewish groups, Ashkenazi and Mizrahi, men and women, with the innermost group enjoying not only liberal and ethno-nationalist rights, but also the privileges of republican citi- zenship: participation in the definition of the common good of society...