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literary

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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2015) 11 (3): 346–348.
Published: 01 November 2015
...Amal Eqeiq Native Tongue, Stranger Talk: The Arabic and French Literary Landscapes of Lebanon Hartman Michelle Syracuse, NY : Syracuse University Press , 2014 . 368 pages. isbn 9780815633563 Copyright © 2015 by the Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2015 In her...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 107–123.
Published: 01 March 2017
... 1994 ; Schmidt 1981 ; Seymour-Jorn 2011 ). Specifically, my analysis of the novel focuses on how poetic prose and the poetry embedded in the text becomes a potent medium for conveying “emotional facts and symbolic truths” (Narayan 1999 , 142) in the literary treatment of a member of Egyptian society...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2005) 1 (3): 125–127.
Published: 01 November 2005
...Christopher Livanos Shirin: Christian-Queen-Myth of Love: A Woman of Late Antiquity—Historical Reality and Literary Effect , Baum Wilhelm . Piscataway : Gorgias Press , 2004 . 114 pp. $38.00 paper. Copyright © 2005 Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2005...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2007) 3 (2): 31–55.
Published: 01 July 2007
... politics. I focus particularly on literary narratives published in the first four decades of the twentieth century. Hoda Elsadda holds the Chair in the Study of the Contemporary Arab World at Manchester University. She was a co-founder and co-editor of Hagar , an interdisciplinary journal of women’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2015) 11 (1): 42–62.
Published: 01 March 2015
...Haytham Bahoora Abstract In the Iraqi literary production of the 1940s and 1950s, the figure of the woman prostitute appeared repeatedly, signaling a crisis in the ways Iraqi men imagined and articulated the contours of women’s liberation. Through an examination of works by Jabra Ibrahim Jabra...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2006) 2 (3): 22–47.
Published: 01 November 2006
... between literary work and critical social history, producing what we may term counterhistories of the Lebanese Civil War and the Partition of India. In both of these novels, a girl upon the verge of sexual maturation sees the eruption of violence in the society around her to be fundamentally analogous to...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2016) 12 (1): 31–49.
Published: 01 March 2016
... society have enriched Saudi women’s literary expression and perception of character. In portraying male characters, women have increasingly steered away from flat, stereotyped, and preconceived notions of men to more balanced and informed representations of men’s behaviors and positions in society. Saudi...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2013) 9 (2): 80–107.
Published: 01 July 2013
... alternative literary depiction of gender and violence, aimed at a Syrian audience, that produces non-normative forms of sympathy to foster national reconciliation after civil conflict. Anne-Marie McManus is completing her Ph.D. in Comparative Literature at Yale University before joining the faculty at...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2019) 15 (1): 3–23.
Published: 01 March 2019
... transnational character of nahda literary culture, as readers and writers scattered across four continents interacted in the textual “spaces” of the rapidly expanding print culture in the Arabic-speaking world. As a single player within an international network of Syro-Lebanese women writers, Karam’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2019) 15 (1): 75–94.
Published: 01 March 2019
... notes how she tends to an analysis of the agency of these immigrants, there is little reference by Lalami to their religious identifiers. This is not an omission but a literary strategy suggesting that religious liaisons form venues of challenge and agency in Islamist revivals. Since faith practices are...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2016) 12 (3): 453–454.
Published: 01 November 2016
...Shahd Alshammari Copyright © 2016 by the Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2016 Women have long used the literary theme of women’s madness as a form of protest within patriarchal cultures. Instead of a strictly Eurocentric approach to female protagonists’ experiences of madness...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2018) 14 (1): 89–91.
Published: 01 March 2018
.... Copyright © 2018 by the Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2018 At a time when major news outlets, pundits, and opportunists all seem to be weighing in on Syria, readers may find it salutary to dive into a study of that country’s contemporary literary production as engaging as Martina Censi’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2013) 9 (3): 139–142.
Published: 01 November 2013
... Middle East women’s studies  9:3 literary studies, which for the most part does not seriously consider the social or gendered construction of the Iranian self. Amy Motlagh’s read- ing of Iranian modernist prose (both novels and short-stories) against the background of changes in...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2011) 7 (2): 109–111.
Published: 01 July 2011
...: Moroccan Women Writers examines how a rich profusion of literary works by women writers belies perceptions of women’s silence and disempowerment in contemporary Morocco. As Diaconoff convincingly illustrates, women have hardly been silent on the literary scene, historically or today. A vast...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 69–70.
Published: 01 March 2017
... commonplace to see women’s names alongside those of men on the lists of all major literary prizes for Arabic literature. Among Arab countries, Egypt has witnessed the largest production of feminist writings. Virtually unnoticed in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, because they were writing...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2016) 12 (3): 422–424.
Published: 01 November 2016
... seven literary tropes through which the city can be understood; the five content chapters then focus on how these tropes are used in a selection of novels about Beirut. Aghacy understands the city of Beirut to be a “multiple construct—urban and rural, sectarian and secular, liberal and conservative...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2019) 15 (1): 95–97.
Published: 01 March 2019
... Levantine feminism” in these works (5). She situates them at the very moment in which Arabic literary works were reconsidering the “gender politics” of Lebanese and Palestinian nationalisms (126). The result, she argues, is a political feminism informed by an ethos of relationality. In her first chapter...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2013) 9 (2): 122–123.
Published: 01 July 2013
... translated into Arabic, Dutch, and German. Christina Civantos is Associate Professor in the Department of Mod- ern Languages and Literatures at the University of Miami, Florida. She specializes in modern Spanish American and Arabic literary and cul- tural studies. Civantos’s main research...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2017) 13 (3): 453–457.
Published: 01 November 2017
... figures of critical dissent. Her first book, Resistance Literature (1987), brought together writings of national liberation struggles from Africa, Latin America, and the Arab world. She challenged the isolationism of area studies and the formalist tendencies of literary criticism that claim literature...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2018) 14 (3): 354–355.
Published: 01 November 2018
... forms of scribal, bureaucratic communication. Gender and class are central features of Yousef’s work, as these were the two central axes on which debates over literary reform centered. Not only were women seen as “susceptible to the moral dangers of reading,” but men were too (62). In 1881 the...