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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2019) 15 (3): 286–306.
Published: 01 November 2019
..., despite representing an important contribution to Algerian literature and women’s life writing. Rather than accepting the “first” novel as an objective category, this article shows how the accolade has obscured works like Wanisi’s from Algerian literary history, reinforced gender and genre binaries, and...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2015) 11 (3): 346–348.
Published: 01 November 2015
...Amal Eqeiq Finally, for students and scholars of Francophone Lebanese literature, the primary strength of this book lies in the excellent footnotes and comprehensive bibliography that include sources in Arabic, French, and English. However, those interested in the Arabic literary canon in...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2017) 13 (1): 107–123.
Published: 01 March 2017
... the Chechens: Problems in Literary Anthropology .” Russian History 30 , nos. 1–2 : 113 – 43 . Hassan Abdalla F. 2012 . “ Making the Life of a Modern Nomad into Literature .” New York Times , January 4 . www.nytimes.com/2012/01/05/world/middleeast/making-the-life-of-a-modern-nomad...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2005) 1 (3): 125–127.
Published: 01 November 2005
... disciplines, especially history and anthropology, in understand- ing the current challenges facing the Middle East and the histories shap- ing its current realities. Shirin: Christian-Queen-Myth of Love: A Woman of Late Antiquity—Historical Reality and Literary Eff...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2007) 3 (2): 31–55.
Published: 01 July 2007
... politics. I focus particularly on literary narratives published in the first four decades of the twentieth century. HODA ELSADDA  31 IMAGING THE “NEW MAN” Gender and Nation in Arab Literary Narratives in...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2021) 17 (2): 220–239.
Published: 01 July 2021
... diasporic literary narratives have functioned as part of what has led to today’s online platforms and cyberactivism. The article approaches these literary narratives as forms of counterdiscourse, rearticulating alternative narratives about women’s movements against compulsory veiling. Produced in diaspora...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2021) 17 (2): 157–176.
Published: 01 July 2021
... welcome and appreciated yet not with much gratifying analysis of the literary and intellectual ventures invested in this first-time production. This article seeks to place this literary event among the feminist literature scholarship of the nineteenth century. For this initial venture to bring recognition...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2015) 11 (1): 42–62.
Published: 01 March 2015
...Haytham Bahoora Abstract In the Iraqi literary production of the 1940s and 1950s, the figure of the woman prostitute appeared repeatedly, signaling a crisis in the ways Iraqi men imagined and articulated the contours of women’s liberation. Through an examination of works by Jabra Ibrahim Jabra...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2020) 16 (2): 124–143.
Published: 01 July 2020
...Leila Sadegh Beigi Abstract Contemporary Iranian women writers contribute to the Iranian literary tradition by writing about women’s roles during the political upheavals leading up to and after the 1979 Revolution. In Simin Daneshvar’s Savushun and Shahrnush Parsipur’s Women without Men , the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2006) 2 (3): 22–47.
Published: 01 November 2006
... between literary work and critical social history, producing what we may term counterhistories of the Lebanese Civil War and the Partition of India. In both of these novels, a girl upon the verge of sexual maturation sees the eruption of violence in the society around her to be fundamentally analogous to...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2013) 9 (2): 80–107.
Published: 01 July 2013
... alternative literary depiction of gender and violence, aimed at a Syrian audience, that produces non-normative forms of sympathy to foster national reconciliation after civil conflict. Anne-Marie McManus is completing her Ph.D. in Comparative Literature at Yale University before joining the faculty at...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2019) 15 (1): 75–94.
Published: 01 March 2019
... notes how she tends to an analysis of the agency of these immigrants, there is little reference by Lalami to their religious identifiers. This is not an omission but a literary strategy suggesting that religious liaisons form venues of challenge and agency in Islamist revivals. Since faith practices are...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2019) 15 (1): 3–23.
Published: 01 March 2019
... transnational character of nahda literary culture, as readers and writers scattered across four continents interacted in the textual “spaces” of the rapidly expanding print culture in the Arabic-speaking world. As a single player within an international network of Syro-Lebanese women writers, Karam’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2020) 16 (2): 103–123.
Published: 01 July 2020
... Dowlatabadi and Saniee occupy in the Persian literary field, both Missing Soluch and My Share reflect the ethos of the 1979 Revolution in some way, one its euphoric beginning and the other its complicated aftermath. The article argues that both novelists pursue an innovative genre of historical writing by...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2016) 12 (1): 31–49.
Published: 01 March 2016
... society have enriched Saudi women’s literary expression and perception of character. In portraying male characters, women have increasingly steered away from flat, stereotyped, and preconceived notions of men to more balanced and informed representations of men’s behaviors and positions in society. Saudi...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2016) 12 (3): 453–454.
Published: 01 November 2016
...Shahd Alshammari Copyright © 2016 by the Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2016 Women have long used the literary theme of women’s madness as a form of protest within patriarchal cultures. Instead of a strictly Eurocentric approach to female protagonists’ experiences of madness...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2018) 14 (1): 89–91.
Published: 01 March 2018
.... Copyright © 2018 by the Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2018 At a time when major news outlets, pundits, and opportunists all seem to be weighing in on Syria, readers may find it salutary to dive into a study of that country’s contemporary literary production as engaging as Martina Censi’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2013) 9 (3): 139–142.
Published: 01 November 2013
... Persian 140  mn  Journal of Middle East women’s studies  9:3 literary studies, which for the most part does not seriously consider the social or gendered construction of the Iranian self. Amy Motlagh’s read- ing of Iranian modernist prose (both novels and short-stories) against the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2011) 7 (2): 109–111.
Published: 01 July 2011
...: Moroccan Women Writers examines how a rich profusion of literary works by women writers belies perceptions of women’s silence and disempowerment in contemporary Morocco. As Diaconoff convincingly illustrates, women have hardly been silent on the literary scene, historically or today. A vast...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2017) 13 (1): 69–70.
Published: 01 March 2017
... commonplace to see women’s names alongside those of men on the lists of all major literary prizes for Arabic literature. Among Arab countries, Egypt has witnessed the largest production of feminist writings. Virtually unnoticed in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, because they were writing...