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libya

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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2015) 11 (1): 98–103.
Published: 01 March 2015
...Julia Clancy-Smith “ Gendering the History of Libya: Transnational and Feminist Approaches ”, “ Centre and Periphery: Variation in Gendered Space among Libyan Jews ,” Simon Rachel “ Reimagining Colony and Metropole: Images of Italy and Libya during the Italo...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2015) 11 (2): 227–229.
Published: 01 July 2015
...Valentine M. Moghadam Crowds and Politics in North Africa: Tunisia, Algeria, and Libya Khalil Andrea Milton Park, UK : Routledge , 2014 126 pages plus index. isbn 978-0-415-73987-0 Copyright © 2015 by the Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2015 Drawing on theories...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2015) 11 (3): 359–361.
Published: 01 November 2015
... our attention, and assisted with translation.—The Editors More than thirty-five women from various cities and backgrounds launched the Libyan Women’s Platform for Peace (LWPP; lwpp.org ) in October 2011 to ensure that women remain a vital part of post-Gaddafi Libya. We emphasize inclusive...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2019) 15 (1): 1–2.
Published: 01 March 2019
... a moment of political uprising that swept the region earlier in the decade. Civil, proxy, and imperialist wars in Syria, Iraq, Libya, and Yemen; the reconsolidation of authoritarianism in Egypt; and the reversal of long-established democratic gains in Turkey—these are all developing realities that...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2016) 12 (1): 122–125.
Published: 01 March 2016
... official language of the country). This emphasis on Amazigh language and culture differentiates Morocco from other countries of the Maghreb (Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, and Mauritania). “Amazighization” of public space led to the feminization of Amazigh activism. As larger Amazigh associations converted...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2017) 13 (3): 483–485.
Published: 01 November 2017
...Hanadi Al-Samman Copyright © 2017 by the Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2017 On January 27, 2017, President Donald Trump signed an executive order (EO) banning citizens of seven Muslim countries—Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen—from entering the United States...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2017) 13 (3): 479–482.
Published: 01 November 2017
... United States has contributed, sometimes significantly—in Iraq, Libya, Syria, Somalia, Sudan, Yemen, and Iran. In either case, the Western gaze reflects a privileged standpoint from which some lives could be brought into the scope of activism and support, and made to matter—to donors, funders, relief...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2018) 14 (3): 348–350.
Published: 01 November 2018
... curating mobile-phone photographs of every bomb dropped on Misrata during Libya’s civil war by Adelita Husni-Bey (291). The anthology began its life online in 2014 with essays, art, and interviews uploaded to Ibraaz, a thriving digital archive for researchers of the Middle East. As a whole, the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2011) 7 (2): 114–117.
Published: 01 July 2011
..., Morocco, Yemen, Tunisia, Libya, Nigeria, Pakistan, Palestine, Sudan, and Syria. Her work thus makes a useful contribution to scholars and students of feminism in the Middle East and Islamic majority countries and to those looking for answers to questions of feminism and religion, captured here...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2011) 7 (2): 117–120.
Published: 01 July 2011
... of these developments, Badran is unsurpassed in her attention to historical detail and factual evidence. Though the majority of her evidence draws from Egypt, she extends her command of history to include Turkey, Morocco, Yemen, Tunisia, Libya, Nigeria, Pakistan, Palestine, Sudan, and Syria...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2011) 7 (3): 36–70.
Published: 01 November 2011
... what is. (Annie Rebehak Gardner, “The Role of Masculinity in the Egyptian Uprising,” Canonball blog, February 10, 2011)4 any observers initially responded to the emergence of popular up- Mrisings that spread from Tunisia to Egypt to Libya and beyond in 2011 with shocked...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2014) 10 (1): 82–104.
Published: 01 March 2014
... what it means to be a citizen appeared foremost on people’s minds.2 Millions took to the streets and squares in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, and Yemen, questioning the rights and obligations once promised to them. Yet, the winds of change that blew across these countries brought more hardship than...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2012) 8 (3): 1–13.
Published: 01 November 2012
... Spring,” namely in Egypt, Tunisia, Libya, and Syria, has been coupled with an over-celebratory read- ing of cyber-technology serving as a mediator for democratic expression and holding the power of change against a backdrop of brutal dictatorship. 2 While our project is primarily concerned...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2005) 1 (2): 112–139.
Published: 01 July 2005
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2014) 10 (1): 149–163.
Published: 01 March 2014
... Revolution”; in the “Arab Spring” insurrections in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya; and now in the actions emanating from Taksim Square/Gezi Park in Istanbul and all over Brazil. Although I do not intend to discuss all of the above examples of 156  mn  Journal of Middle East women’s studies  10:1...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2008) 4 (1): 107–124.
Published: 01 March 2008
... status and family rights. Hamada’s comments below strongly suggest that it was at the First Congress in 1930 that Tehran was selected as one of the sites for the Second Congress two years later. Th e Tehran meetings featured speakers from Japan, Iraq, Libya, and Syria, and numerous Iranian women...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2005) 1 (1): 110–146.
Published: 01 March 2005
... share of other sectors insignificant. In the 1970s, Tunisia and Jordan were labor-sending countries (largely to Libya, Iraq, and Saudi Arabia), while Iran was a labor-receiving country (mainly Korean and Afghan workers and Western engineers and technicians). Remittances by Arab...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2013) 9 (1): 81–109.
Published: 01 March 2013
... identity (i.e. Arab-Americans). Others resided in Australia, Canada, Egypt, Iraq, the United Kingdom, Palestine, Lebanon, and Saudi Arabia. The majority of the members stated Arab countries (Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Mo- rocco, Palestine, Saudi Arabia, and Yemen) as their...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2014) 10 (3): 40–61.
Published: 01 November 2014
... (“Indignant Ones”) movement; Iceland’s “Kitchenware Revolution”; the “Arab Spring” insurrections in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya; and the actions emanating from Taksim Square/Gezi Park in Is- tanbul and in various squares in Greater Khartoum, Sudan (Khartoum, Khartoum North, and Omdurman). I use only...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2014) 10 (3): 62–86.
Published: 01 November 2014