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lebanese

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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2009) 5 (2): 93–96.
Published: 01 July 2009
...Hala Khamis Nassar Qissat: Short Stories by Palestinian Women , Glanville Jo , ed. London : Telegram , 2006 . Pp. 188. ISBN 978-1-84659-012-2 . Hikayat: Short Stories by Lebanese Women , Khalaf Roseanne Saad , ed. London : Telegram , 2006 . Pp. 222. ISBN 978-1-84659-011...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2009) 5 (3): 102–119.
Published: 01 November 2009
...Mona Chemali Khalaf This paper presents the preliminary results of a study that focuses on a micro aspect of Lebanese migration, i.e. the emigration of the head of the household and its impact on decision-making and well-being within the family, essentially on the wife left behind. For that purpose...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2009) 5 (3): 145–174.
Published: 01 November 2009
...Nadine Naber This article is based on ethnographic research among southern Lebanese in Dearborn, Michigan, in the aftermath of the 2006 war in Lebanon. It focuses on the significance of family and gender in the intensification of long-distance nationalism among Lebanese in diaspora. The war...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2009) 5 (3): 120–144.
Published: 01 November 2009
... focusing on a case study of Lebanese families who have migrated to North America in the past decade. Ethnographic data on who wants to migrate, their identification with the nation, the nature of the family, and its geographical stakes suggest a need to rethink the transnational families literature on...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2010) 6 (2): 86–114.
Published: 01 July 2010
...John Tofik Karam This article asks how Syrian-Lebanese men and non-Middle Eastern Brazilian women have enacted their relationship to belly dancingin São Paulo. While men and women of Arab origins have usually framed the dance as an essential link to their ethnic heritage, non-Arab female...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2012) 8 (1): 115–139.
Published: 01 March 2012
...Sune Haugbolle This article discusses how militiamen who fought in the Lebanese civil war (1975–1990) have been represented in Lebanese cultural production and how these militiamen relate to public discourse on masculinity and culpability in the postwar period. Through an analysis of interviews...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2014) 10 (3): 126–128.
Published: 01 November 2014
...-2. Reviewed by Evelyne Accad, University of Illinois, Lebanese American University The principal purpose of Hoda Elsadda’s Gender, Nation, and the Ara- bic Novel: Egypt, 1892-2008 is to mark itself within the canon of Arabic literature using gender as its principal framework of...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2006) 2 (3): 22–47.
Published: 01 November 2006
... between literary work and critical social history, producing what we may term counterhistories of the Lebanese Civil War and the Partition of India. In both of these novels, a girl upon the verge of sexual maturation sees the eruption of violence in the society around her to be fundamentally analogous to...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2012) 8 (3): 113–137.
Published: 01 November 2012
... sexualized meanings and queer desires within GayRomeo.com with local politics and practices affords new forms of self-description and embodied practice online as a queer Lebanese subject. Using context analysis to explore manifestations of selfhood within GayRomeo.com, as well as secondary literature about...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2009) 5 (3): 54–73.
Published: 01 November 2009
...Jihad Makhoul; Mary Ghanem This study explores the experiences and views of women and their families who have been affected by displacement due to the Lebanese civil war. Despite the popular notion that displaced families have returned home, the effects of displacement continue to be felt by...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2009) 5 (3): 74–101.
Published: 01 November 2009
...Ray Jureidini From a series of interviews with Lebanese middle- and upper-class women in their latter years, the paper traces an oral history of domestic service in Lebanon over the past century. The interviews reveal various periods when women and girls were recruited from the local village poor...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2018) 14 (3): 268–291.
Published: 01 November 2018
... American Arabia and Wartime Beirut (2009). It considers the geopolitics of oil and the worlds it produced in the intimate relations and domestic quarters of the Aramco oil camp in the 1950s and 1960s, in the authors’ childhoods in Beirut during the Lebanese civil war, which also involved US imperialism...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2019) 15 (1): 3–23.
Published: 01 March 2019
... transnational character of nahda literary culture, as readers and writers scattered across four continents interacted in the textual “spaces” of the rapidly expanding print culture in the Arabic-speaking world. As a single player within an international network of Syro-Lebanese women writers, Karam’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2010) 6 (1): 147.
Published: 01 March 2010
... Families under Siege: Lebanese Shi‘a in Dear- born, Michigan, and the 2006 War on Lebanon,” in the last issue of JMEWS (5:3), page 147, following line 1, in planning solidarity events with Lebanese people I show that the transnational character of southern Lebanese fami- lies connected these...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2015) 11 (3): 346–348.
Published: 01 November 2015
... preface, Hartman poses three critical questions that underline the inherent tension of writing Lebanese literature in French: “Can a work written in a colonial language like French express the everyday realities lived in Arabic in Lebanon? Can this be done in a way that does not simply ‘spice up’ the text...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2018) 14 (2): 224–226.
Published: 01 July 2018
...Jake Silver Queer Beirut . Sofian Merabet . Austin : University of Texas Press , 2014 . 287 pages. isbn 9780292760967. Copyright © 2018 by the Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2018 In Sofian Merabet’s Queer Beirut , a walk through the Lebanese capital is far...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2015) 11 (2): 254–255.
Published: 01 July 2015
... secularism and religion, and interdisciplinary studies of the state and sexual/gendered citizenship. I focus on two phenomena. One is the Lebanese state’s regulation of religious conversion, a practice the state and its courts consider proof of their secularity. The state actively protects the rights of...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2016) 12 (3): 422–424.
Published: 01 November 2016
... Ibrahim’s Beirut, Beirut (1984). A particular strength of Aghacy’s book is her attention to representations of Beirut by non-Lebanese authors, who situate the city within a pan-Arab context and emphasize its relevance beyond its Lebanese and diasporic borders. In her introduction, Aghacy pinpoints...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2015) 11 (3): 368–370.
Published: 01 November 2015
... Copyright © 2015 by the Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2015 HELEM means “dream” in Arabic and is the acronym for Lebanese Protection for Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals, and Transgenders (LGBTs), which includes protection for persons with nonnormative sexualities and gender identity...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2019) 15 (1): 95–97.
Published: 01 March 2019
... Levantine feminism” in these works (5). She situates them at the very moment in which Arabic literary works were reconsidering the “gender politics” of Lebanese and Palestinian nationalisms (126). The result, she argues, is a political feminism informed by an ethos of relationality. In her first chapter...