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leadership

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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2010) 6 (2): 59–85.
Published: 01 July 2010
... women outside the usual structures. I describe a “leadership industry” that seeks to reproduce established models of activism, raising questions about the replicability of activist “pipelines” and calling attention to their use as a prop for unjust and inadequate social and political structures...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2011) 7 (2): 123–125.
Published: 01 July 2011
..., the film focuses on the women’s pri- vate lives rather than on their social and political work. We hear little of the women’s religious opinions, except that they all believe that Islam makes space for female religious leadership. Yet while all three women serve as “religious...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2015) 11 (2): 258–259.
Published: 01 July 2015
... diverse, success was not always measured against the effort to eliminate patriarchy or vie for leadership positions. Instead, I argue that the howzevi women worked to strengthen the Islamic state by increasing the availability of Islamic jurisprudent research concerning women; through their presence...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2015) 11 (3): 365–367.
Published: 01 November 2015
... Tunisian women). The mission and focus of the association today are to promote the values of citizenship among women; support female leadership and encourage women to play an active role in decision making; identify the key concerns of rural women and propose concrete solutions; and be the voice for...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2006) 2 (2): 146–149.
Published: 01 July 2006
... the fore the role of DFLP ideology in allowing women to rise to leadership positions in the organization, asserting that the party’s Marxist Leninist tradition, liberal intellectualism, and rejection of traditionalism provided a more open space for women partisans. However, she also...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2018) 14 (1): 129–132.
Published: 01 March 2018
... where miriam cooke walked in. She was elected president of AMEWS in 2000 at a moment that AMEWS might not have survived. A small group of us gathered around miriam and worked to strengthen AMEWS. It worked because miriam was in the leadership. She was calm, reasonable, and understanding. She...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2010) 6 (2): 115–122.
Published: 01 July 2010
... transnational mi- grants from first- and second-generational backgrounds, mostly Egyp- tian organizational and clerical leadership, and a burgeoning population of white and black American converts, is contemplating the contempo- rary evolution of a seemingly intractable Islamic law and its...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2019) 15 (1): 117–124.
Published: 01 March 2019
.... For thirteen years I dedicated every day of my life to these beloved community-organizing efforts, creating the women’s committee from scratch and developing a leadership body that helped the AWC expand to more than eight hundred members. We recruited our members the old-fashioned way—by door knocking...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2015) 11 (1): 1–2.
Published: 01 March 2015
... humanities. After ten years at Indiana University Press under the enthusiastic leadership of Janet Rabinowitch, JMEWS moved to Duke University Press with the publication of volume 11. After four years at Yale University, the Editorial Office also moved to Duke University and the University of North...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2018) 14 (3): 351–353.
Published: 01 November 2018
... positions of leadership in business, government, science, literature, and media. The two sides often agree that the Saudi state is a force for emancipation. It pushes women to achieve high educational levels, appoints them to key government positions, and provides generous welfare programs to improve their...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2008) 4 (1): 31–52.
Published: 01 March 2008
..., already a central fi gure in the women’s movement of the late Ottoman Empire (Zihnioğlu 2003; Tezcan 2004). Muhiddin was instrumental in forming the short-lived Women’s Popular Party (Kadınlar Halk Fırkası) in 1923. When republican leadership balked at having a sepa- rate women’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2015) 11 (2): 227–229.
Published: 01 July 2015
... transient, almost ephemeral phenomenon and very risky in the absence of strong political institutions and leadership. Hence the problems that Libya has faced compared with Tunisia. But even in Tunisia “the crowd” turned out to be divided and indeed polarized, as evinced by the intense debates in the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2015) 11 (3): 350–353.
Published: 01 November 2015
... blow to the legitimacy of the ruling AKP came in June 2013, when massive numbers of men and women of various ideological persuasions and positions took to the streets to protest Erdoğan’s leadership and Islamist conservatism despite police violence. Liberal support for the AKP disappeared after the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2015) 11 (3): 359–361.
Published: 01 November 2015
... transition, women’s rights, youth leadership, security, women’s political and economic participation, constitutional reform, and education. The LWPP has grown into a network of over one hundred organizations and individuals. It has also been involved in creating platforms of dialogue with different Libyan...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 138–140.
Published: 01 March 2017
... reproducing the nation are familiar tropes in this narrative, as is providing material and emotional support for spouses, whether they are active in the movement’s formal leadership or studying religious texts. Feminism, commonly associated with a toxic secular Western agenda, is viewed as destroying gender...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2012) 8 (2): 105–107.
Published: 01 July 2012
..., book reviews  mn  107 commitment, and leadership. Ulfah approaches knowledge of the Qur’an as a social resource to help young Muslim women negotiate the complexities of post-Suharto regime politics and potentially en- gage in a “transformation of self” (229). Some aspects of this study...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2010) 6 (2): 1–30.
Published: 01 July 2010
... e new party’s core leadership was already in place, prior to unifi - cation, as a distinct Islamist faction within the governing General Peo- ple’s Congress (GPC) in the North. Th is faction was heavily infl uenced by the Egyptian Muslim Brothers, but upon emerging as an independent formation...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2013) 9 (3): 81–107.
Published: 01 November 2013
... movements’ leadership, they do not represent an elite class. In both movements, women lead- ers share a history of poverty, and their limited material improvements came through their own labor. In this respect, they represent the class background of most members in the movement. Their words, which I...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2014) 10 (3): 109–124.
Published: 01 November 2014
... yet forms political coalitions with the traditional leadership. The paucity of job opportuni- ties means that males continue to dominate the few administrative and leadership posts available, thus strengthening existing male domination (Swirski and Safir 1991). In the education system...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2017) 13 (3): 395–415.
Published: 01 November 2017
... religious authorities and religious law that among other things require women’s purity and limit women’s public leadership and activities. Women for the Temple activists, most of whom are mothers, define themselves as guardians of domestic space and the House of God (the future Third Temple) and...