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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2012) 8 (3): 63–88.
Published: 01 November 2012
...Serkan Gorkemli This article focuses on the Internet as a “digital closet” in the context of Turkish lesbian and gay activism in the 1990s and early 2000s. In its analysis of media and sexual discourse, the article first discusses traditional media, such as the printing press and television. While...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2012) 8 (3): 14–40.
Published: 01 November 2012
... on the Internet, discourses of protectorship, valorizations of mobility in cyberspace and diasporic imaginations, and the political and economic opportunities for neoliberal entrepreneurship and expertise during the war on terror. In this process, the normative Iranian homosexual is produced as a victim...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2012) 8 (3): 41–62.
Published: 01 November 2012
... to fully understand Egypt’s contemporary political culture, we must also understand the ways and words that individuals use to describe their lives on the Internet. Evaluating colonization and imported modes of policing, censorship, identity formation, geographical location, and a stirring national...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2012) 8 (3): 1–13.
Published: 01 November 2012
..., and sexuality. For the mainstream media, as well as for many Facebook and Twitter users, Amina often appeared as the new hero of computer revo- lutions,1 as a brave and Internet-savvy young woman. In the early days of June, the media’s attention focused on Amina’s disappearance. She was assumed to have...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2013) 9 (1): 81–109.
Published: 01 March 2013
.... Rita Stephan  mn  83 Online environments can contribute to furthering “the fragmen- tation of identity” (Kolko, Nakamura, and Rodman 2000, 5), and their safety is often contested. Cyber-snooping and data-mining is becoming more widespread. However, the Internet does provide safety from...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2021) 17 (3): 449–453.
Published: 01 November 2021
... by, and shatter, the widespread liberal democratic claim about “the internet as the bedrock of revolutionary movement in the Middle East” and “the internet as the subversive opposite of the nation” (39, 65). This claim, for Shakhsari, “misses the point that Weblogistan and other sites of civil society...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2018) 14 (3): 314–332.
Published: 01 November 2018
..., relative to the number of sexually active people in the Muslim world and the 147 million internet users in the Middle East (as of June 2017, according to www.internetworldstats.com/middle.htm ), the internet space devoted to discussing the religious permissibility of EC in Islam is strikingly small. We...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2012) 8 (3): 113–137.
Published: 01 November 2012
..., and demographic information. Through their profiles, users engage in embodied practices of masculinity and sexuality that influence subjectivity via their online visibility.  n Lebanon, the Internet has become more than a gateway into global Iflows of queer culture (McCormick 2006); queer...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2012) 8 (3): 139–142.
Published: 01 November 2012
...- Gulfian community, with the Internet serving as a mediator for the pro- duction of a queer imaginary. While the boyah signifies a shared system of cultural representation within the region of the Arab Gulf, national specificity is often articulated within such queer self-stylizations. For example...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2022) 18 (2): 320–328.
Published: 01 July 2022
... of Women in Economic, Social, and Managerial Empowerment: The Case of Saudi Arabia .” Economies 2020 8 , no. 2 : 1 – 18 . Al-Qarni Ali . 2004 . “ The Information Revolution, Globalization in the Arab World: A Study of the New Media (Satellite Broadcasting and the Internet) and Their Impact...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2020) 16 (2): 144–164.
Published: 01 July 2020
...” and civil-society movements of the younger generations and progressive forces. Within Iran, the internet and social media have become a space of newfound freedom for younger generations. This is especially true for young women, who have the opportunity for greater freedom of expression amid the oppressive...
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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2008) 4 (3): 89–118.
Published: 01 November 2008
... themselves publicly visible, expressive, and mobile. Previously, women’s writing had been limited to those who were professional writers or had some literary talent, but with the emergence of the new Internet technol- ogy and the phenomenon of weblog writing or blogging, women’s writ- ing gained...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2024) 20 (1): 1–22.
Published: 01 March 2024
... to the slow development of broadband internet infrastructure, the high cost of high-speed internet, and high illiteracy rates, television and radio are the dominant forms of media (Osman 2020 ). Although digital media are slowly gaining traction, their access and usage are still limited in Eurasia...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2006) 2 (3): 107–109.
Published: 01 November 2006
... Sakr’s ambitious volume focuses on social relations, on how Middle Eastern women shape and are shaped by the press, television, and internet. Chapters span the region from Morocco to Iran, incorporate a variety of disciplinary approaches, and examine a range of media topics from early twentieth...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2006) 2 (2): 35–59.
Published: 01 July 2006
... and contesting” the hegemony of authoritarian political and/or reli- gious centers (Eickelman and Anderson 1999:1). New communications technologies, including fax, telephone and the Internet, are creating a new sense of accountability toward a public that is increasingly challenging...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2020) 16 (1): 94–99.
Published: 01 March 2020
... that is mainly concerned with sharing stories of struggle and solidarity and that wishes to avoid orientalism and savior voyeurism, it seeks, for the moment, to not be significantly exposed on the internet. Since its third issue Zaʾfaraan has been able to secure funding to compensate poets and artists...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2015) 11 (3): 368–370.
Published: 01 November 2015
... expressions. The organization presented its official registration documents as an LGBT rights group to the Lebanese government in 2004. But its inception dates to 1998, as increased Internet access in Lebanon led to the establishment of queer social groups, such as the Gay Lebanon forum and mailing list...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2012) 8 (3): 143–154.
Published: 01 November 2012
... and political divide; others congratulated the Internet for bringing people together, echoing the celebratory tone of the “Facebook revolu- tions” narrative so prevalent during the “Arab Spring.”2 On the other hand, critical voices noted, for example, the inequality of Internet access...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2012) 8 (3): 89–112.
Published: 01 November 2012
... instantiations. While the principal focus is on the movement of the categories of éffeminés, gigolos, and MSMs, it also considers the conditions of possibility for the emergence of a gay movement in Tunisia, enhanced by Internet- based technologies. Analysis is derived from ethnographic field...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2010) 6 (2): 59–85.
Published: 01 July 2010
... of young Egyptians’ innovative strategizing is online ac- tivism. Granted, only those who can aff ord it have internet access, and access is restricted through censorship, but usage grows every day and it is by and large a young, urban cohort who drive this development. Th e number...