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imagination

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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2009) 5 (2): 85–88.
Published: 01 July 2009
... and fi rmly embedded within larger discussions about race and racial formation. Th erefore, it is uniquely positioned to stretch these dialogues in vitally important ways. Imagining Arab Womanhood: Th e Cultural Mythology of Veils, Harems, and Belly...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2023) 19 (3): 449–457.
Published: 01 November 2023
.... For these reasons, they cannot be confined or contained within certain spaces and times; they need to be accounted for outside Western (his)torical and contemporary accounts. With that being said, we wanted to (re)imagine SWANA futurities 1 by centering peoples’ lived experiences, emotions, relationalities...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2015) 11 (1): 42–62.
Published: 01 March 2015
...Haytham Bahoora Abstract In the Iraqi literary production of the 1940s and 1950s, the figure of the woman prostitute appeared repeatedly, signaling a crisis in the ways Iraqi men imagined and articulated the contours of women’s liberation. Through an examination of works by Jabra Ibrahim Jabra...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2017) 13 (1): 107–123.
Published: 01 March 2017
...Caroline Seymour-Jorn Abstract This article focuses on the Egyptian writer Miral al-Tahawy’s 1996 novel The Tent ( al-Khibāʾ ). This ethnographically informed novel sheds light on liminal, emotional, and imaginative aspects of social and personal life—those aspects that tend to be particularly...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2012) 8 (3): 14–40.
Published: 01 November 2012
..., the “gay international” (in the words of Joseph A. Massad), and some Iranian diasporic queers who willingly insert themselves into national imaginations of the opposition in diasporic reterritorializations. This hypervisibility is enabled by massive mobilizations of universalized sexual identities...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2017) 13 (2): 265–286.
Published: 01 July 2017
... (symbolized by Zahwa’s underground world), where imagination and code can resist oppression, escape censoring, interrogate the sacred, excavate sources of power, subvert the normative, and evade Western co-optation. Siham Abu al-Omrain ( 2011 , 49) maintains, however, that interpreting women’s creative...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2018) 14 (1): 45–67.
Published: 01 March 2018
... with single mothers to imagine alternative maternal futures. I argue that by invoking a counternarrative I call “aspirational maternalism,” single-mother advocates disrupt traditional maternalist rhetoric that excludes single women. Aspirational maternalism draws on moral discourses and neoliberal values...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2007) 3 (2): 31–55.
Published: 01 July 2007
... representations of the New Man have always been a subtext in representations of the New Woman, the manifestations and implications of these constructed imaginings within the Egyptian nationalist narrative have yet to be explored. In this article I consider constructions of the New Man through what men say about...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2008) 4 (2): 60–80.
Published: 01 July 2008
..., this paper finds that the soldier justified British imperialism in Dhofar through his implicit assumptions of “knowing more” and “knowing better” than the Dhofaris/Arabs, even concerning their own nature, desires, and interests. Using these assumptions, the soldier was able to imagine himself as an “imperial...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2009) 5 (2): 53–82.
Published: 01 July 2009
... on women’s writings revealed intimate aspects of the Ottoman elite’s relationships in general and of Ottoman women in particular, and suggests that their publication in popular magazines played an important role in re-imagining the Turkish woman in the framework of the post-Kemalist nationalist discourse...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2010) 6 (1): 103–116.
Published: 01 March 2010
... women exploring issues of gender, faith, social justice, and human rights across historical and cultural boundaries. I argue that the imaginative recovery of Farrokhzad by Iranian immigrant women writers and artists not only complicates the West’s frequently reductive contemporary representations...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2008) 4 (1): 6–30.
Published: 01 March 2008
... standards of equal rights feminism, the Women’s Party contributed to an enduring aspect of Iranian culture in which national conversations imagine a global audience. The thesis rests on two elements: 1) the use of recently published Iranian document sets and a previously unused press source to illustrate...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2024) 20 (1): 43–68.
Published: 01 March 2024
... work to create the figure of the “Kurdish woman.” Instead of falling into the trap of Orientalist constructions of womanhood, Kurdish diasporas imagine “Kurdish woman” as a way to challenge nation-state assimilation projects and erasure by practicing identity at the intersections of ethnicity, religion...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2006) 2 (1): 95–121.
Published: 01 March 2006
..., and that is the suggestive power of the imagination (Osman 1993:13). y first encounter with Egyptian writer and critic Etidal Osman1 was Min the spring of 1992.2 We had arranged over the telephone for an in- terview in the offices of the government-run General Book Organization, where she...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2016) 12 (1): 93–95.
Published: 01 March 2016
... of masculinist and imperialist agendas” (175). Thematizing translocality, the third chapter probes the efficacy of bringing the Arab homeland directly into the US space through imaginative “re-member[ing]” of past traumas often elided from US history (110). These spatiotemporal and imagined geographic...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2009) 5 (3): 120–144.
Published: 01 November 2009
... desired migration to imagine and materialize their futures outside the nation. Shortly aft er my research with these families began in 1994, a number of them started leaving the village for Canada and the U.S. Within a decade, half of the core families with whom I had done most of my interviews...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2021) 17 (3): 449–453.
Published: 01 November 2021
... in cyberspace do not escape forms of governmentality,” including through “gendered forms of normalizing, disciplining, and censorship,” thus ironically recuperating “nationalist imaginations of exclusive Iranianness” (39, 35, 65). In chapter 1, “Weblogistan and the Iranian Diaspora: Nation and Its Re...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2011) 7 (3): 71–97.
Published: 01 November 2011
... of desirability in the negotiations of the Middle East. Jared McCormick is a Ph.D. candidate in Social Anthropology at Harvard University. His work focuses on mobility and imagination in the landscape of Beirut and on conceptions of masculinity, subjectivity, and the creation of space. McCormick is also...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2023) 19 (3): 317–336.
Published: 01 November 2023
... a respectable framework in which to go out and realize the newly imagined self. This study explores the process of literary self-making among contemporary Cairene women writers from the perspectives of life course and spatial mobility. Departing from the concepts of subjectivation, degendering, and literary...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2023) 19 (3): 458–468.
Published: 01 November 2023
... Siyasi ( The Critique of Political Economy ), a vibrant leftist publication in Iran. It is an early attempt to theorize how a women’s revolution might imagine a broader democratic politics. To this end, it introduces the new concept of jiyanism , designating a feminine politics of life...