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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2009) 5 (3): 102–119.
Published: 01 November 2009
..., a sample of 107 households was selected from a national survey covering 18,243 households conducted by Saint Joseph University in Beirut. After drawing the profiles of the households surveyed, this study uses four independent variables—the husband’s income, the length of the husband’s absence, the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2015) 11 (3): 283–305.
Published: 01 November 2015
... interventions that suppressed expert witnessing by local women birth attendants ( qabla s) and instead privileged the witness credibility of husbands as heads of households. Copyright © 2015 by the Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2015 Algeria colonial law colonial medicine expert witness...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2008) 4 (2): 1–28.
Published: 01 July 2008
... women have been able to overcome their infertility through ARTs, not all women’s lives are improved by these technologies. The Iranian civil law emphasizes that family is a warm and placid institute founded upon the authority of the husband and the father. Motherhood and doing housework are the woman’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2009) 5 (1): 80–93.
Published: 01 March 2009
... husbands. It also shows that some women were subjected to violence during childhood and adolescence. The study points to the lack of legislation and official organizations to protect women from violence and suggests ways and means of dealing with the problem in Qatari society. Dr. Kaltham al-Ghanim...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2007) 3 (3): 1–20.
Published: 01 November 2007
.... Reasons for this surgery are examined, including physician avarice, masculinity expectations within homosocially competitive fertility regimes, and husbands' desires to share the burden of reproductive suffering with beloved wives. It is argued that within the Middle East, men as well as women are heavily...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2008) 4 (2): 87–99.
Published: 01 July 2008
... college graduates or had attended or were currently attending college. Seventy-eight percent of subjects were between 20 and 30 years old. Forty-fi ve percent of responders said they lived with their parents, 21% lived with their husband’s parents, and 34% lived in their own house or...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2018) 14 (2): 230–232.
Published: 01 July 2018
... women otherwise separated by class, education, and location. Elmas has little formal education and lives in a provincial town with her husband and mother-in-law. Şehnaz is a highly educated urbanite living with her boyfriend in Istanbul and commuting to a provincial hospital to complete her mandatory...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2005) 1 (2): 157–162.
Published: 01 July 2005
... busies herself with other household chores, including carpet weaving. Her husband was martyred in the Iran-Iraq war (1980-88), leaving her a widow. Reminiscing about him, she sweetly but bashfully admits how much she misses and dreams of him and how she liked him when they got...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2009) 5 (1): 24–49.
Published: 01 March 2009
... STUDIES 5:1 to the traditionalist school, “Th is verse is primarily concerned with the domestic relations between husband and wife. It legislates men’s author- ity over their women, which entails the male’s right to discipline his women in order to ensure female obedience both toward...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2018) 14 (1): 78–82.
Published: 01 March 2018
... home and the family must acquiesce to some of her wishes. Hossein Farahbakhsh’s Lollipop offers an unusually harsh illustration. The young Maral is pregnant from an affair with Farhad, the older husband of her cousin Maryam. Farhad appears sensible and successful but with a darker side alluded to...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2013) 9 (1): 110–125.
Published: 01 March 2013
...- rect questions about money; rather I used indirect methods, like talking about their memories and dreams about family matters and what they thought about the way their husbands made and spent money. I relied on focus group discussions to cross-check the information I had gathered...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2015) 11 (2): 258–259.
Published: 01 July 2015
... exhibiting false consciousness. I find that the howzevi women were both facilitated and limited by self-imposed practices, such as exercising caution about their social visibility outside the home or showing deference toward their husbands and fathers. Because their experiences with the “rule of men” were...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2009) 5 (1): 116–119.
Published: 01 March 2009
... property converted to money, that women received from their husbands when they were married, and which they themselves controlled. In Shatzmiller’s view, these inter vivos gift s, along with the property and inheritance rights which Islamic law guaranteed to women, are key to appreciating female...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2012) 8 (2): 102–104.
Published: 01 July 2012
... reviews  mn  103 and between marriage and commercial transactions. It seems that slav- ery affected the entire legal understanding of marriage as it was central to the jurists’ conceptual world (8). Early Muslim jurists saw marriage as a transaction that gave a husband, in return for payment, a...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2006) 2 (3): 122–124.
Published: 01 November 2006
... centers on the mother and Dunyazad, the family as a whole is aff ected by the loss. Th e novel also depicts the husband’s feelings about the tragedy, as he must decide how and when to tell his wife, make arrangements for the funeral, and inform family members on both sides. Friends are...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2005) 1 (3): 108–115.
Published: 01 November 2005
... objection specifying the legal grounds for her failure to obey her husband within thirty days of receiving the notice, she is considered deviant (n∂shiz) and denied alimony upon divorce. Obedi- ence notices cannot in themselves prevent a woman from obtaining a divorce. However, they are...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2016) 12 (1): 2–30.
Published: 01 March 2016
... husband from easily divorcing her. Asking for a large final dowry offered women some protection against a man’s unilateral right to divorce in Islam. Through this contractual agreement, Miryam symbolically preserved her financial security in light of a conversion that may have broken existing ties with...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2017) 13 (2): 315–317.
Published: 01 July 2017
... before marriage and to her husband after marriage, sexual violation was viewed as the usurpation of another man’s property. Evidence of this line of thought can be found in contemporary language, such as in the Arabic term for rape ( ightisab ), which at its root conveys the meaning of “usurpation...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2018) 14 (3): 359–361.
Published: 01 November 2018
... hitherto exclusive link between femininity and food in Egypt” (33) by revealing the centrality of food to men’s fluid identities as husbands, fathers, and sons. Her interlocutors, inspired by duty as well as by affection, regularly and proudly shop for fresh vegetables, fruits, and meat for their families...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2019) 15 (1): 117–124.
Published: 01 March 2019
..., uprooted from their homelands, fleeing unspeakable war and violence, and dealing with extreme poverty, immigrant and refugee women arrive here facing enormous challenges. Most of their husbands work more than seventy hours a week in small shops or as peddlers. Women with limited English skills are left to...