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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2007) 3 (3): 75–98.
Published: 01 November 2007
...Ashraf Zahedi This article examines the history of the veil and its changing social meanings in Iran. Embedded in the meaning of the veil is the erotic meaning of female hair. The symbiotic relations of the “cover” (the veil) and the “covered” (female hair) are central to this history. Iranian...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2018) 14 (3): 362.
Published: 01 November 2018
... erasures of petroleum imperialism, reminding us to consider the present through a genealogical lens. Dressed in the modern urban attire of the period, hair coiffed and eyes gazing candidly at the camera, the family members wear expressions from excitement to confusion. The teenaged Fahmi Basrawi sits in...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2016) 12 (2): 181–202.
Published: 01 July 2016
... private beauty schools, municipally run classes on bodily grooming and beauty, online discussion forums on the topic, beauty fairs, and makeover reality television series, in 2014 over seven thousand hair and beauty salons were listed in the Istanbul Chamber for Women Hairdressers and Manicurists. 1...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2009) 5 (1): 1–23.
Published: 01 March 2009
... market. “Within days of libera- tion, the country itself was coming out of hiding,” writes di Giovanni. “Th ere were new things for sale in the bazaar—strange, forbidden things: books, condoms, hair dryers. Now, packages of hair dye with scantily clad Swedish models adorn shop windows...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2010) 6 (3): 19–57.
Published: 01 November 2010
..., Australia, India, China, Japan, and South Africa, emerged in the interwar period. She was a “glocal” figure meant to whet the consuming appetites of elite and upper-middle-class women.1 She shared the Modern Girl’s essential features of bobbed hair, smiling face, painted lips, and an...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 135–137.
Published: 01 March 2017
... many memories of my visits and then my year in Egypt: the warning not to leave home with wet hair, because that advertises that you’ve just had sex; my evening at After 8 club, in which a gay couple took the dance floor as well as a beautiful tall transgender woman; and the young policeman who thought...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2006) 2 (1): 138–140.
Published: 01 March 2006
... of the rights of her inmates. Tahereh attempts to crush Mitra’s strength by giving orders to shave her long hair and by torturing her physically and psychologically. In this game of power, which lasts seventeen years, the two women live together through contempt, hatred, and harmony. Mitra’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2009) 5 (1): 100–102.
Published: 01 March 2009
... who are primarily interested in gender stud- ies and debates on immigration and transnationalism in Europe. Bowen begins by noting that scarves are not unusual in the Mediterranean: the Spanish mantilla, Hermès scarves, and images of Grace Kelly meander- ing through Monaco, hair bescarved, are...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2016) 12 (3): 433–449.
Published: 01 November 2016
... sectarian connotation is apparent in this account. Rather, Hussein decries nonnormative masculinities as against Islam and the Iraqi nation: The rabble-rousers do not know these notions [of tribal loyalty to the dictator]. Those who dye their hair in green and red do not know these meanings, and it is a...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2015) 11 (3): 354–358.
Published: 01 November 2015
... hair down to her shoulders and making the Facebook “Like” sign with one hand. At her feet a Facebook page in the form of a cage shows an angry rat addressing several “mice” Internet surfers: “An open-minded minister doesn’t suit us, you have to defame her by any means necessary.” In her other hand...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2006) 2 (1): 140–143.
Published: 01 March 2006
... terms of American expectations of what a Muslim should look like—like most Bosnian Muslims, Tahija clearly does not fit the bill with her white skin, blond hair, and absence of head scarf, though we see her in another scene kneeling in prayer in proper Islamic dress. Yet even within the scope of...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2006) 2 (3): 119–122.
Published: 01 November 2006
... “Kite Full of Color,” which is about a young woman made to behave in front of a glamorous suitor. Although the girl tries, she cannot lock her spirit and against her mother’s warnings lets her hair loose and runs on the beach barefoot. “Shadow Puppets” portrays women’s sexuality against the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2005) 1 (2): 153–156.
Published: 01 July 2005
... for more control over women; at no place, they assert, does the Qur’an require covering of woman’s face or hair. I was particularly pleased that the authors do not shy away from discussing very sensitive topics such as “honor” killings, female genital mutilation, and very...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2015) 11 (1): 117–123.
Published: 01 March 2015
... the afternoon, and my sister and I had to wait outside in the playroom while my mother talked to the police. I looked outside through the window, and it was pitch black again . Here I started my new life as a war refugee, marked by my black hair and brown skin among the tall blond kids in my class...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2016) 12 (2): 275–283.
Published: 01 July 2016
..., long-legged, luxurious haired, buxom beauty.” Ultimately, Arab Muslim dolls are Barbie dolls made from a mold almost exactly the same as Barbie’s. So a Barbie with an Arab Muslim identity presents stereotyped expressions of an Arab Muslim girl, with subtle differences and slight variables between what...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2011) 7 (3): 71–97.
Published: 01 November 2011
... gay community. The outward appearance of bears often includes: “hairy bodies and facial hair; some are heavy-set; some project an image of working-class masculinity in their grooming and appearance…. Some bears place importance on presenting a hypermasculine image; some may shun interaction...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2015) 11 (2): 139–160.
Published: 01 July 2015
... becoming part of our socialization. You are expected to wear it. It doesn’t matter if you’re convinced or not. … What matters is that you cover your hair. Even the form doesn’t matter.” Their fashionable veiling practices often emerge from dominant gender norms and pressures, including, for example...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2005) 1 (2): 157–162.
Published: 01 July 2005
... veiled mother. Back in Tehran, she looks very different and stylish, wearing a white wraparound scarf that reveals her black hair. Rahela is a young idealist woman who is freshly out of college. She is, in my view, the most interesting and genuine of the five. She is clearly from a religious...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2018) 14 (2): 259–263.
Published: 01 July 2018
... department full of men, many of them old, performing imposition, magnetized to their spots in chairs or atop small wooden stages in lecture halls, solemnly intoning their lessons, Rula was a spinning, fluid force. I was a young seventeen-year-old. As I looked at this beaming short-haired woman, unashamedly...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2013) 9 (1): 54–80.
Published: 01 March 2013
.... Muhammad Iqbal Siddiqui (2001, 59 – 61) accordingly writes of the permissibility of the man to gaze at the woman prior to marriage, to see if she pleases him. The prolific Iranian cleric Murtaza Mutahhari, too, encourages the suitor to examine the face, hair, and shape of a prospective wife. In...