1-20 of 76 Search Results for

gay

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2017) 13 (2): 244–264.
Published: 01 July 2017
... guy,” minimize participation in a gay lifestyle, and render their gayness as imperceptible as possible. In contrast, the image adopted by the professional middle class is predicated on individualistic values enabling an autonomous self. Based on cultural capital and middle-class values, the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2012) 8 (3): 63–88.
Published: 01 November 2012
...Serkan Gorkemli This article focuses on the Internet as a “digital closet” in the context of Turkish lesbian and gay activism in the 1990s and early 2000s. In its analysis of media and sexual discourse, the article first discusses traditional media, such as the printing press and television. While...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2018) 14 (2): 242–245.
Published: 01 July 2018
... conversed. While our chat that day was supposed to be focused on my schooling documentary, it mostly turned into a conversation about his life as a gay rights defender. Mahmoud eventually became my right hand in that film production and a good friend. He has since received refugee status in Germany, where...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2016) 12 (3): 433–449.
Published: 01 November 2016
... numbers of cross-dressing boys and men, Hussein’s emphasis on this issue suggests that he thought so; moreover, the fatwa he refers to is often cited by Islamist ideologues in order to legitimate violence against gays (Zollner 2010 ). While it may seem odd for a secular dictator to quote this fatwa, it...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2016) 12 (2): 203–224.
Published: 01 July 2016
...Sibylle Lustenberger Abstract This article analyzes the place of intimacy in the encounters between Israeli gay men and Indian surrogates. While transnational surrogacy is often presented either as an act of solidarity or as a contract for mutual benefit, the article complicates this picture. The...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2016) 12 (2): 225–245.
Published: 01 July 2016
... processes together: trans women’s gender reassignment processes in public hospitals and gay men’s medical examinations to receive exemptions from compulsory military service. In both sites institutional observation and practice are preoccupied with penile penetration as a tool to eliminate and hence...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2012) 8 (3): 89–112.
Published: 01 November 2012
... of their associated onto-epistemic instantiations. While the principal focus is on the movement of the categories of éffeminés, gigolos, and MSMs, it also considers the conditions of possibility for the emergence of a gay movement in Tunisia, enhanced by Internetbased technologies. Analysis is...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2012) 8 (3): 14–40.
Published: 01 November 2012
..., the “gay international” (in the words of Joseph A. Massad), and some Iranian diasporic queers who willingly insert themselves into national imaginations of the opposition in diasporic reterritorializations. This hypervisibility is enabled by massive mobilizations of universalized sexual identities on...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2012) 8 (3): 41–62.
Published: 01 November 2012
... instance blogging, I argue that subversive optimism, coupled with online activism, has the potential to challenge existing structures of heteronormativity. According to my findings, change hinges on challenging difficulties and disconnects between gay men’s and lesbian women’s experiences. Grant...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2012) 8 (3): 113–137.
Published: 01 November 2012
...Mathew Gagné This paper explores how the participation of men in Beirut within the exclusively gay-male dating web site GayRomeo.com is framed by identity politics and practices of national and ethnic membership, masculinity, and sexuality in post-civil war Beirut. Such intermingling of the...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2011) 7 (3): 71–97.
Published: 01 November 2011
...Jared McCormick This inquiry explores questions of movement and tourism in relation to sexuality within the context of Lebanon’s nascent gay travel industry. The first section examines how imagery of Arab men is mediatized and circulated, with (un)intended effects. Many of the images take form...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2018) 14 (2): 224–226.
Published: 01 July 2018
... since the 1990s, for example, led many young gay men, unable to afford such extravagant nightlife, to congregate and socialize along the Corniche, Beirut’s seaside promenade. He points out that most of these young men are drawn to this space for recreation, constituting a queer social space within...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2017) 13 (2): 219–221.
Published: 01 July 2017
... mobility may help us recognize how different performances of gendered, sexual, and other identities are called forth in different places due to the unevenness of formal and informal regulatory regimes. In this issue Haktan Ural and Fatma Umut Beşpınar’s study of gay men in Ankara, Turkey, provides such an...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2012) 8 (3): 1–13.
Published: 01 November 2012
... mn n June 2011, shortly after the events now often described as the Arab ISpring, Western media was preoccupied with the story of the “Gay Girl in Damascus”—a queer blogger from Syria, who identified herself as Amina Arraft—writing extensively about her life, family, politics, and...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2015) 11 (3): 368–370.
Published: 01 November 2015
... Copyright © 2015 by the Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2015 HELEM means “dream” in Arabic and is the acronym for Lebanese Protection for Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals, and Transgenders (LGBTs), which includes protection for persons with nonnormative sexualities and gender identity...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2011) 7 (3): 98–112.
Published: 01 November 2011
... INTRODUCTION his article is an account of the formation of the lesbian, gay, bisex- Tual, and transgender (LGBT) group, Himaya Lubnaniya lil Mith- liyeen wal Mithliyat (HELEM). In Arabic, the name means “Lebanese protection for gays and lesbians,” and its acronym means “dream.” HE...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2015) 11 (2): 254–255.
Published: 01 July 2015
... political, legal, and sexual rights that are different from other sectarian communities. This social movement considers secularism to have its own “culture,” one that promotes religious and cultural tolerance, women’s rights, economic independence, gay rights, and free speech. The advocates believe that a...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2018) 14 (2): 252–254.
Published: 01 July 2018
... adultery. Sociocultural norms entitle men to even more privileges, including freer mobility and more autonomy in their premarital sexual lives, provided these sexual encounters are defined as masculine and heteronormative. However, men with nonnormative sexual orientations or practices, such as gays...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2015) 11 (3): 331–336.
Published: 01 November 2015
... as the “gay international” and the “United Nations international.” Activists are also portrayed as naive participants in Western discourses engineered by Islamophobic, homonationalist, or femonationalist projects. Abu-Odeh pointed to the rich history in the Arab world of intellectual activists...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 November 2011) 7 (3): 1–5.
Published: 01 November 2011
... sentimen- tality of the private sphere, which had been the localities of femininity. Likewise, gay rights were born out of a hyper visibility of the sexual— not for an essential reason but because the social taboo on representing gay male sexuality was the modality of power. To change this, sexual...