1-10 of 10 Search Results for

freud

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2011) 7 (1): 39–69.
Published: 01 March 2011
... suicide. Based on Mahtab’s story and my ethnographic work with some of the surviving former women inmates, this paper engages with Sigmund Freud’s notions of survival, mourning, and melancholia in light of their intertwined relationship to the re-formation of the subject. I argue for the centrality of...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2018) 14 (1): 109–115.
Published: 01 March 2018
... rack his brains about the enigma of life and death. —Sigmund Freud, “Thoughts for the Times on War and Death” I have understood part of miriam cooke’s work over the years to embody a commitment to understanding the forms of cultural production that emerge in the context of life beside a corpse or...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2012) 8 (2): 1–25.
Published: 01 July 2012
... main approaches to intentionality in psychology have been “drive” theory and “relational-models.” Formalized by Sigmund Freud (Strachey 1999) and psychoanalytic schools, the hegemonic drive theory underwrote most approaches to the subject in the fields of psychology, political science...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2015) 11 (2): 161–178.
Published: 01 July 2015
... Symbolic order through sublimation. She separated her personal identity from affiliations that could breed eruptions of the Real. Sublimation for Sigmund Freud is “a process in which sexual libido is redirected towards non-sexual aims” (Evans 1996 , 13). Lacan ( 1992 , 109, 110, 114), arguing for a...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2013) 9 (1): 30–53.
Published: 01 March 2013
...). More importantly, they deflate some of his power by portraying him in caricature. According to Sigmund Freud: Caricature, as is well known, brings about degradation by emphasiz- ing in the general impression given by the exalted object a single trait which is comic in itself but was...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2013) 9 (1): 54–80.
Published: 01 March 2013
..., and its fulfillment are not conceived of as being for, or being found in, a particular person. The blindness of erotic inclination and the resultant interchangeability of persons are also foregrounded in the earlier quote by Ukasha Zaid. Citing Sigmund Freud, Zaid (2003, 16) writes that any...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2016) 12 (2): 143–165.
Published: 01 July 2016
.... Mahrem boundaries are regulated in order not to attract a foreign gaze, which produces sexual scripts in public settings. The gaze as a producer of a sexual script is an expansion of the psychoanalytic approach that considers gaze a love object, which Sigmund Freud first argued and Jacques Lacan...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2017) 13 (1): 71–86.
Published: 01 March 2017
... the dagger; his fear of the officers echoes his dread of his father. Like the stick and the dagger, the military uniform turns Hamidu into a subordinate representative of the patriarchy. Was El Saadawi agreeing with Freud’s claim that “anatomy is destiny” (Vaillant 1998 , 25)? When she introduced...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 March 2012) 8 (1): 115–139.
Published: 01 March 2012
... (2007) description of this militaristic manhood is rife with sexual overtones. His rite of passage is to man the oiled gun in the trenches covered in sweat and dirt. What would Sigmund Freud have said about that as a metaphor? He is hiding from his mother (27) in order to impress the older men...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (1 July 2011) 7 (2): 1–26.
Published: 01 July 2011
... most Orientalists, as well as the modernist Muslim writers, like Muhammad Husayn Haykal, dismissed the importance of Amena’s dreams in discussing the cir- cumstances that led to the Prophet’s birth. While she did not mention Freud’s understanding of dreams, Abdel Rahman considered...