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Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2007) 3 (2): 86–109.
Published: 01 July 2007
... provide an example of women resisting, negotiating, and pressing for their rights, transforming their position while their employment increased. However, the forces of globalization and the impact of the national and international political economy played an important role in the defeat of the reform...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2008) 4 (3): 12–30.
Published: 01 November 2008
...). Copyright © 2008 Association for Middle East Women’s Studies 2008 12  JOURNAL OF MIDDLE EAST WOMEN’S STUDIES 4:3 WOMANHOOD IS NOT FOR SALE: Sabiha Zekeriya Sertel Against Prostitution and for Women’s Employment...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2017) 13 (3): 376–394.
Published: 01 November 2017
..., laundry stealing, scams, and stealing from domestic employers. Given their low wages, poor and working-class women had difficulty meeting their material needs in a semicolonial capitalist urban economy even when they worked in legal occupations. In addition, the legal work most available to them...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2021) 17 (3): 326–347.
Published: 01 November 2021
.... This article reconsiders that frame and argues for a class-centered reassessment of “ladies aid” politics exploring the intersections of women’s relief with proletarian mutual aid strategies. Founded in 1917, the Syrian Ladies Aid Society (SLAS) of Boston provided food, shelter, education, and employment...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2009) 5 (3): 74–101.
Published: 01 November 2009
... as well from among Syrians, Palestinians, Kurds, Egyptians, and others in accordance with convenience and regional political circumstances. The long-term employment of Arab women in domestic service, with a primary focus on “live-in” maids, may be characterized as carrying a “burden” of obligation...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2005) 1 (2): 112–139.
Published: 01 July 2005
... and North Africa (SWANA),1 attention has been drawn to the low rates of paid employment among women (Moghadam and Khoury 1995; Olmsted 1999; World Bank 2004b), with the argument often being made that this is an indication of women’s “underutilization” and vulner...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2005) 1 (1): 110–146.
Published: 01 March 2005
... GH n this article I examine changes in patterns of women’s employment and Isocial policies pertaining to women in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), and make comparisons between two periods: the oil boom era of the 1960s–1980s, and the period of liberalization since...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2020) 16 (1): 87–93.
Published: 01 March 2020
... are required to have a host-country sponsor, who is responsible for maintaining their legal status and controlling their mobility. The institution leaves a growing community of migrant workers, mostly women employed in domestic service, with no legal rights to escape abusive employers and poor working...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2012) 8 (2): 78–101.
Published: 01 July 2012
... theory regarding the division of household responsibilities suggests that women are largely confined to the domestic sphere and men to paid employment. According to this theory women’s labor participation is minimal and only secondary (Silver 1993). Other theories emphasize women’s...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2007) 3 (3): 99–102.
Published: 01 November 2007
... 2007) © 2007 100  JOURNAL OF MIDDLE EAST WOMEN’S STUDIES involvement in societal development have worked to advance the cause of women. These include: 1. Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948). 2. Equal Remuneration Convention (1951). 3. Employment...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2014) 10 (3): 109–124.
Published: 01 November 2014
... to the acquisition of higher education as an opportunity for personal advancement, financial and social mobility, and avoidance of social inferiority (Abu-Baker and Azaiza 2010, Pessate-Schubert 2003). In recent years, Arab women’s higher education has enabled them to integrate in employment outside the home...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2005) 1 (2): 55–88.
Published: 01 July 2005
..., clinic staff explained she could obtain state-subsidized prenatal care at a municipally run Mother-Child Health (MCH) center in her neighborhood instead of traveling to East Jerusalem each month. Second, they explained that since she was working regularly, her employer could...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2005) 1 (3): 20–45.
Published: 01 November 2005
... access to education, health care, employment, and political participation. Th ey lay at the heart of what the UN has identifi ed since 1991 as the central basis of human development, whose goal “is to enlarge the range of people’s choices and to make development more democratic...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2009) 5 (2): 101–104.
Published: 01 July 2009
... pushed women out of this sector of the labor market, which had historically been the largest employer of middle- and working-class women. Meanwhile, a large number of working-class women and women heads of household were, out of economic necessity, obliged to work to support...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2006) 2 (1): 65–94.
Published: 01 March 2006
...- larly for women, which Fargues (2003) as cited in DeJong et al. sum- marises as follows: “it [rise in age] is protective against early childbirth and associated with greater educational and employment opportunities” (53).1 The role of education is also singled out by others as the most im...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2011) 7 (3): 6–35.
Published: 01 November 2011
... and not an identity, and there are men in the construction or service industries, such as taxi drivers or hotel employees, who suffer serious violations of their rights and are possibly “tricked” (i.e. trafficked) into their cur- rent employment situations. Furthermore, neither of these scenarios account...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2015) 11 (1): 132–133.
Published: 01 March 2015
... the Family. In practice, this means that women are the main providers of housework and care work. The consequence of women’s increased unpaid domestic labor is that women have less access to paid employment, which pushes them into low-paid, flexible, and insecure jobs. This makes women dependent...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2009) 5 (1): 105–108.
Published: 01 March 2009
... on the training and employment of women health workers (murshidat) byby a Dutch-YemeniDutch-Yemeni developmentdevelopment projectproject inin Yemen’s Red Sea port city, Hodeida. By focusing not on the institutions or intended “benefi ciaries” of development, but rather on the heteroge- neous actors involved...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2009) 5 (3): 1–10.
Published: 01 November 2009
... wider kin networks intensify the feeling of a life that is not famil- ial, not familiar. As one woman says, “We never felt comfortable in any house we moved to We fear whoever knocks at our door.” Residence without the required legal documents, irregular male employment, and inability...
Journal Article
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies (2016) 12 (1): 126–138.
Published: 01 March 2016
.... Islamization permeated streets, public transportation, and places of public and private employment. For some of the women, the ability to attend a university expanded their social freedoms and allowed them to achieve a modicum of independence through employment. The sense of security the women discussed...